Centre for Ecology & Hydrology

The Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) is a public-sector research centre - part of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) - which delivers independent research, survey, training and knowledge transfer in the environmental sciences to advance knowledge of planet Earth as a complex, interacting system.

We conduct independent mission-driven research in support of NERC’s strategic goals and work in close partnership with the scientific community, government departments and agencies, as well as the private sector.

Located at sites in England, Scotland and Wales, our National Capability and extensive network of long-term monitoring and experimental field sites provide access to diverse ecosystems and support an internationally renowned research capacity.

Our research is aimed at improving understanding of the environment and the processes that support life on Earth. We are particularly interested in the impacts of human activity on the world around us and in developing ready-to-use approaches for achieving environmental sustainability.

Our skills and expertise range from the smallest scale (the gene) to the largest scale (whole Earth systems). Our science tackles the environment in a holistic manner, integrating a wide range of scientific disciplines. This combines basic, applied and strategic research.

In partnership, we are a major custodian of environmental data, including 89 million records of 40,000 species occurring across Britain and Ireland, as well as records of over 50,000 station years of daily and monthly river flow data, derived from over 1,300 gauging stations throughout the UK.


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Data about farms’ financial situation as well as the weather could help identify those most vulnerable to drought. Bidgee/Wikimedia Commons

Drought forecasting isn’t just about water – to get smart we need health and financial data too

Forecasting drought should be about more than weather – to help those likely to be hit hardest, we need financial and even health data too.
Une harde de sangliers traverse un ancien village irradié. Valeriy Yurko

Les animaux sont de retour à Tchernobyl

Sangliers, cerfs, loups et élans on été repérés en grand nombre dans la « zone d’exclusion », ces quelques 4750 km² qui environnent l'ancien site de la centrale nucléaire.
150,000 square kilometres of tropical rainforest is destroyed every year. Threat to democracy

Carbon emissions must not distract us from conservation

With current concerns focusing, quite rightly, on controlling carbon emissions, it is easy to lose sight of the need for continued conservation efforts. In fact our recent study published in the Proceedings…
Pollution face masks are not just for China. Dave Thompson/PA

Air pollution is not yet a thing of the past

It may seem odd for the European Commission to declare 2013 the “Year of the Air” in order to focus on improving air quality standards. Most would feel air pollution is a problem that has been more or…

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