Curtin University

With more than 44,000 students, Curtin University is one of Australia’s largest tertiary institutions. Based in Perth, Western Australia, it boasts a strong international presence with campuses in Sydney, Singapore and Malaysia. Curtin offers a broad range of undergraduate and postgraduate courses in business, health sciences, humanities, Aboriginal studies, science and engineering. It is also recognised for its research in the areas of minerals and energy, ICT and emerging technologies, health and sustainable development.

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Schools should teach students about peace and pluralism to reduce radicalisation, not necessarily about every world conflict and religion. Australian teen Jake Bilardi with Islamic State fighters. AAP Image/Twitter

Teaching terror: what role for schools in countering violent extremism?

Introducing new curriculum requirements to teach young people about specific issues or requiring teachers to look out for signs of radicalisation are just as likely to have little or no impact if not supported by evidence.
Picking a fight with a media company should not be a politician’s priority. AAP/Nikki Short

Hockey’s defamation win is dark news for democracy and free speech

The elephant in the room in the just-concluded defamation case between Joe Hockey and Fairfax Media was the actual story being attacked. Media organisations ought to be able to instigate the debate without fear of reprisals by litigious politicians.
Avoiding contact with people who have respiratory infections – and are coughing or sneezing – is the key to protection. Jina K/Shutterstock

Explainer: what is the MERS outbreak in South Korea?

Twelve years ago the world was threatened by an outbreak of a new coronavirus called SARS. MERS belongs to the same virus family and has killed 19 people in South Korea.
Martha Rendell was the last woman to be hanged in Western Australia, in 1909. Depicted here as imagined by newspapers in the 1980s. Wikimedia Commons

Iconic murders: fictionalising the life of Martha Rendell

Iconic murderers such as Martha Rendell electrify our imaginations and passions. The turn of the century case demonstrates why fiction can be such an effective vessel for history.
Makies was the first company to respond to the #ToyLikeMe social media campaign. Image courtesy of MyMakie

Disability and dolls: #ToyLikeMe is a mark of progress

Makies, the #toyslikeme campaign and the broader focus on disability in digital spaces show we are in the midst of a significant shift towards an inclusive world view of disability.
Better to have all the kids matching? from www.shutterstock.com.au

School uniforms – a blessing or a curse?

There's no evidence to say school uniforms are better or worse for learning, but dress codes do teach kids a thing or two about civics.
The current emphasis on the investor housing boom masks a long-neglected, Iong-term structural problem. AAP/Paul Miller

The facts on Australian housing affordability

Housing affordability, high house prices and rents are attracting plenty of media attention right now. The latest figures on house prices, mortgages, number of first time buyers and so on are dissected…
Stella Young, the late disability activist in whose name TEDx Sydney launched #stellaschallenge. AAP Image/Supplied

Doing justice to disability: the upside of TEDx’s Stella bungle

TEDx Sydney launched a campaign to initiate conversations around disability in the name of the late campaigner Stella Young. The project was ill-conceived but it points to the need for listening closely to people with disabilities.
The Joint European Torus (seen here with a superimposed image of a plasma) is one of the machines helping to unlock fusion power. Wikimedia Commons

Nuclear fusion, the clean power that will take decades to master

Why don't we have nuclear fusion power yet? Because it involves taming plasmas at temperatures far hotter than the Sun's core. But the good news is that physicists are slowly but surely figuring out how.
The government taxation mantra of lower, simpler, fairer doesn’t seem to extend to indexing bracket creep. AAP/Mick Tsikas

Taxation by stealth: bracket creep and the budget

The government is counting on bracket creep to quietly add to its tax collections. But this is simply taxation by stealth.
Agriculture remains a major employer in Australia but the challenges of competition, food security and climate change are on the horizon. AAP image/supplied by Graincorp

Australia’s ‘five strong pillar economy’: agriculture

As the Coalition government prepares its second budget, how is the "five pillar" economy promised by Tony Abbott faring?
The rationale for cutting advisory bodies has been reducing red tape - but the loss can often be a valuable counter-opinion. Image sourced from shutterstock.com

Dumping of markets advisory board is another independent voice lost

The decommissioning of the Corporations and Markets Advisory Committee mans the government loses an independent source of advice - at a time they arguably need it.
The way forward? Light rail helps urban development far more than roads do - the challenge is how to pay for it. AAP Image/Dave Hunt

How to build light rail in our cities without emptying the public purse

Light rail is good for cities, but it's also expensive, which is why many Australian cities have opted for buses instead. But there is a way to get top-drawer public transport using private dollars.
Has treasurer Joe Hockey already made up his mind about the more controversial tax suggestions in the recent Re:think discussion paper? AAP/Lukas Coch

The Tax white paper - only good for fish and chips now?

Treasurer Joe Hockey's media comments this week around contentious tax issues don't bode well for the Taxation White paper.

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