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9/11 ‘Truthers’ at a protest in Los Angeles. Damon D'Amato

Why Conspiracy Theories Aren’t Harmless Fun

We’ve just seen another mass shooting in the US. This time it was a church, and race hate was the cause. Other times it’s a school, or a cinema, or a university, or a shopping mall. By now, the script…
We wouldn’t get very far without lubricin keeping our joints moving. tableatny/Flickr

Nature’s lubricant makes your body a well-oiled machine

You may not have heard of the protein lubricin, but it's what keeps your body moving. And now it's being used to treat disease and produce new therapeutics.
Fan tributes on Oscar Wilde’s tomb. Chrissy Hunt/Flickr

The literary pilgrimage: from Brontëites to TwiHards

The desire to connect with literary places supports a substantial tourist trade. And the reasons why people embark on literary pilgrimages are as diverse as the kinds of fiction that inspire them.
Australia’s reaction to revelations that its citizens were fighting for IS follows a pattern of intellectual and state fear-mongering. AAP/Lukas Coch

Radical Islam and the West: the moral panic behind the threat

If governments are to maintain public support for their military ventures, war narratives must be kept simple and consistent. The underlying message must not change: the West is always the innocent victim of terrorism, never its perpetrator.
A NSW programme in which prisoners train stray dogs as part of their rehabilitation is one of a number of innovations adopted in recent years. AAP

Crime and punishment and rehabilitation: a smarter approach

Approaches to crime that rely on punitive methods have proved to be ineffective and counter-productive. Rehabilitation programmes not only prevent crime, but are cost-effective and practical.
Stoats (Mustela erminea), feral cats (Felis catus), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and black rats (Rattus rattus) are invasive predators in different parts of the world. Clockwise from top left: Sabec/commons.wikimedia.org (CC BY-SA 3.0); T Doherty; CSIRO/commons.wikimedia.org (CC BY 3.0); 0ystercatcher/Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Killing cats, rats and foxes is no silver bullet for saving wildlife

Research published this week shows saving wildlife is much more complicated than killing introduced predators. Killing predators often doesn't work, and is sometimes actually worse for native wildlife.
It’s impossible to compare student work against a database of sources because each pay-for plagiarised assignment is a bespoke creation. AAP/Alan Porritt

Policing won’t be enough to prevent pay-for plagiarism

We could be fooled into thinking pay-for plagiarism is a modern, high-tech invention. However, the internet merely supports the logistics.
If the proposals are agreed, they could delay the market entry of generic medicines in the region – and the impact will be felt around the world. Jeng_Niamwhan

RCEP: the trade agreement you’ve never heard of but should be concerned about

Seven rounds of negotiations for the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership have already taken place with virtually no public debate. The next round of negotiations begins today in Kyoto, Japan.
Myanmar has carried out discriminatory policies against the Rohingya for decades. Nyunt Win/AAP

Between the devil and the deep blue sea: the Rohingya’s dilemma

Despite international pressure, Myanmar’s government intends to continue the decades-long program of discriminatory policies against the Rohingya that denies them their human rights.

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