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While plans to close ‘unsustainable remote communities’ have triggered recent protests, at the heart of the issue is the nature of the relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. AAP/Richard Iskov

Who decides? A question at the heart of meaningful reconciliation

Decisions being made from on high about the fate of remote Indigenous communities are symptomatic of a continuing imbalance in the relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.
Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Diggers of the Gaza graveyard

We are used to thinking of Gaza as a war-torn stretch of ground. A place where life goes grimly on in the face of an intractable conflict. A graveyard not only for civilians caught in the crossfire, but…
Bitto has remarked on the major impact of the Stella Prize and the conversations it has encouraged about women writers. Jone

Debut novelist Emily Bitto wins the Stella Prize

Emily Bitto has won the 2015 Stella Prize for her debut novel, The Strays. The prize is now in its third year and was established to redress the way in which women writers were typically overlooked for major literary prizes
Australia’s gas market is entering a time of change: increasing supply, such as coal seam gas, can provide certainty. Ben Jenkins/Flickr

Coal seam gas can provide certainty in a time of market chaos

Australia's "looming gas shortage" - the basis for calls to deregulate coal seam gas - may not be real after all. But gas prices are still set to rise, and that's an area where coal seam gas could help.

Bishop’s Gambit in Tehran

We get the English word ‘chess’ from the Persian word Shah (king). The linguistic identification of this part of the world with chess belies its Indian origins, but in a country where the ancient nobility…
Silent tributes at the tomb of the unknown soldier at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra, representing more than 100,000 men and women lost in war. Lukas Coch/AAP

Australia’s unknown soldier: a powerful symbol of loss and faith

Why did it take three-quarters of a century beyond the first world war for Australians to build our own tomb of the unknown soldier, remembering the 23,000 Australians who died with no known grave?
Due to shortages of subject specialist teachers, too often teachers are having to teach subjects they don’t know about. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Too many teachers teaching outside their area of expertise

Australia continues to be plagued with high numbers of teachers teaching subjects they are not qualified to teach, according to the latest Australian Council for Education Research report
The human and financial costs to Australia of following America’s lead in imprisoning more and more people are huge. Shutterstock/BortN66

Prisons policy is turning Australia into the second nation of captives

The US is the great incarcerator, spending US$60 billion a year on prisons, and Australia is sliding down the same path. The solution? Confine jails almost exclusively to sexual and violent offenders.
Assistant Treasurer Josh Frydenberg’s figures were taken form the Intergenerational Report, but we should be wary of economic projections that claim to see 40 years into the future. AAP Image/Joel Carrett

FactCheck: was Australia on a debt trajectory heading to 122% of GDP?

Any forecast 40 years ahead is fraught with uncertainty, so we should be wary of warnings Australia was on a trajectory of debt and deficit heading to 122% of GDP.
The process by which women become fans is more complicated and interesting than people previously imagined. AAP Image/Joe Castro

Sexually transmitted fandom? Why women really follow AFL

Men might believe that women don't have what it takes to be serious sports fans but new research into female AFL fans proves them wrong. Some women are footy converts, some have it in the blood – and some were born to it.
In 1915, Australians came to terms with total war – and were prepared for the battle at Gallipoli and conscription in 1916. Australian War Memorial/Flickr

1915 in Australia: the reality of total war sinks in

It was not the excitement but the seriousness of the first world war that captured the imaginations of Australians. The experience of 1915 had a marked effect on local commitment to winning the war.

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