Deakin University

Deakin University was established in 1974 and combines a university’s traditional focus on excellent teaching and research with a desire to seek new ways of developing and delivering courses.

Links

Displaying 1 - 20 of 956 articles

The birds commonly seen in urban backyards of Australia are increasingly introduced species like this house sparrow, sharing a birdbath with a native red-browed finch. Wanda Optland

Is it really so wrong to care for an introduced bird species?

We all know how vital it is for our native bird species to thrive. But what if the only birds that visit your garden are introduced "pest" species? Many people feel these birds deserve some love too.
Many literary questions about smell are quite philosophical. Why do humans get pleasure from perfumes? Do rich bodies smell differently from poor ones? from www.shutterstock.com

Armpits and melons: an olfactory reading of James Joyce

Smell is the Cinderella of the senses in Anglophone literature, but James Joyce wrote an olfactory revolution. His treatment of the science of smell was astonishingly prescient.
Iraqi soldiers gather near the remains of wall panels and colossal statues of winged bulls that were destroyed by Islamic State militants in the Assyrian city of Nimrud, late last year. Ari Jalal/Reuters

Erasing history: why Islamic State is blowing up ancient artefacts

Islamic State has destroyed globally-significant sites in Iraq and Syria, but not as wanton acts of destruction. Instead, they are calculated political and religious attacks.
Russia’s supposed influence on Donald Trump’s election victory did not reveal anything about American democracy that Russians did not already suspect. Reuters

Making sense of Russiagate: what do Russians think?

Russian media both hint toward the Russian regime’s prowess in influencing the US election, while simultaneously treating the accusation as baseless Western propaganda.
Why have successive federal governments not regulated junk food marketing to control obesity? The reasons aren’t as obvious as you might think. from www.shutterstock.com

Fat nation: the rise and fall of obesity on the political agenda

No wonder obesity is a tough public health issue for governments to deal with. Our research has uncovered a range of barriers to tackling it, some more obvious than others.
Indigenous children depicted in an etching playing the game of marngrook, which some have claimed inspired the game of Australian rules. Wikimedia Commons

Indigenous players didn’t invent Australian rules but did make it their own

The revival of the idea of Indigenous influence on the origins of Australian rules football diverts attention from another, much more uncomfortable story about Indigenous relationships to football.
Dingoes can help manage devastating red fox and feral cat numbers, but only if we let enough of them live in key areas. Bobby Tamayo

Thinking big gives top predators the competitive edge

Dingoes and wolves can help control destructive smaller predators, new research shows, but only if we encourage them across wide areas.
Families who are around at mealtimes can check their relatives are swallowing food properly and alert nursing home staff if there’s a problem. from www.shutterstock.com

The shocking state of oral health in our nursing homes, and how family members can help

Poor oral health in our nursing homes can lead to many complications, including choking to death. Here's how family and staff can help advocate for better care.
Roger Stone: for some the brain behind Trump and the star of a new documentary film.

The - Roger - Stone Age Man

Roger Stone, "the prince of darkness", has been called "Trump's brain". So what is going on in there? And what does it mean when ruthless cunning becomes the new morality?

Research and Expert Database

Authors

More Authors