Flinders University

Since its establishment in 1966, Flinders University has enjoyed a well-justified reputation for excellence in teaching and research. It has a long-standing commitment to enhancing educational opportunities for all and a proud record of community engagement.

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Articles (1 - 20 of 241)

There’s a sense that people who want to be child-free are somehow draft-dodging the duty of parenthood – we’ve done it and suffered, so why haven’t you? Hanna Nikkanen/Flickr

People who don’t want kids deserve respect for their choice

Societies overwhelmingly endorse reproduction, but the pressure this places on people who don't want to have kids may be putting their health at risk.
George Brandis shocked the arts sector – and particularly the Australia Council – with his overhaul of the allocation of arts funding. AAP Image/Dean Lewins

The arts minister has wrenched our culture away from the artists

The more the 2015 arts budget is examined the less sense it makes. The changes contribute little strategically or politically – they just make an entire sector nervous. And culturally, they will improve nothing.
Billions were expected to be saved from the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme – but surprisingly the budget only outlines $252 million in savings. Lukas Coch/AAP

Federal Budget 2015: health experts react

The big surprise about this year’s health budget was what wasn’t there – billions of dollars in expected savings from the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.
Onstage at the JC Williamson Theatre Royal in Sydney in 1935. Are we treating our playwrights any better than we did then? Wikimedia Commons

Australian plays: how to persuade a nation to question its own soul?

Playwriting occupies a weak position in Australian culture because its historical role is not to be "good", but to be socially acceptable. We need now to take a modern attitude to drama.
When Australians hear about Foreign Minister Julie Bishop’s dire warnings and counter-terrorism raids, they could lose historical perspective on the threat posed by Islamic State. AAP/Mal Fairclough

With jihadists among us, is IS more of a threat than communism was?

Dire government warnings and counter-terrorism raids in our suburbs paint a picture of the worst threat Western nations have ever faced. A little historical perspective is in order.
Without the contributions of its army of volunteers – six million of them in all – Australia would be a profoundly different place. AAP/David Crosling

Ten things you should know about volunteering’s immeasurable value

It's National Volunteer Week, which celebrates the contributions of one in four Australians. Vounteering has 10 core features that should be considered to understand this integral part of our society.
Speeches such as Bickmore’s should be the start of a conversation about what is funded, not its conclusion. Joe Castro/AAP

Who should have a say in what medical research is funded?

While I can't fault Carrie Bickmore for trying to get attention for the disease that prematurely killed her husband, her move does raise questions about how research should be funded.
Duncan Graham’s 2010 play Cut does not reveal itself as a traditional play does – but it’s a powerful demonstration of the evolution of theatrical storytelling. Garry Cockburn

Playwriting doesn’t get better or worse – but it does evolve

Drama involves an altered representation of reality – and the way we understand both the representations and the reality evolve. Duncan Graham's recent play Cut shows how significantly those understandings change.
Forget the doom and gloom about the humanities: employment and research in the sector continues to rise. Smithsonian American Art/Flickr

Are the humanities in crisis? In Australia, the sector is thriving

There's plenty of hand-wringing about the humanities being in crisis – but is that actually the case? In Australia, the sector is thriving, and policy should be made on that basis.
Shell Necklace, Displayed at the Great Exhibition, London, 1851. Maireener shell and fibre. Oyster Cove, Tasmania, before 1851 © The Trustees of the British Museum.

Indigenous Australia: Enduring Civilisation is a challenge to review

It hovers uneasily between being a fine-art exhibition showing the diversity and sheer visual and sociocultural potency of contemporary Australian visual art practice, and an older-style ethnographic survey.
Artist’s impression of NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft encountering Pluto and its largest moon, Charon. NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Let the people decide new place names on Mercury and Pluto

Who gets to name the craters and features on our planets was once an ad hoc affair. But now the public can have a say with just days left to vote.
The investigation that brought down the NSW Premier, Barry O'Farrell, is one of several that has put the powers of ICAC in the spotlight. AAP/Dan Himbrechts

Are corruption watchdogs out of control? Their records say no

ICAC has claimed some high-profile scalps, prompting some claims that the watchdog is out of control. Yet our new research shows 99% of complaints don't proceed to a formal investigation.
David Lynch: Between Two Worlds is a major event for Brisbane. David Lynch's Emily Screaming. 2008. GOMA

Meeting a god: the diverse career of David Lynch on show at GOMA

Brisbane's Gallery of Modern Art is hosting the exhibition, David Lynch: Between Two Worlds, until June 7. It's an opportunity to explore the connections between all the elements of Lynch’s artistic output.
In the past decade, the number of people ending up in South Australian prison cells has grown at seven times the rate of the state population. AAP/South Australian Correctional Services Department

State of imprisonment: South Australia’s prisoner numbers soar, with just 10% of budget for rehab

Since 2004, the number of prisoners in South Australia has risen seven times faster than the state's net population growth – and nearly doubled its rate of locking up Indigenous Australians.
Social Services Minister Scott Morrison has said eight out of 10 income taxpayers go to work to fund Australia’s welfare bill. AAP Image/Lukas Coch

FactCheck: do eight out of 10 taxpayers work every day to pay our $150b welfare bill?

Implying that 80% of Australian income tax goes straight towards the welfare bill overlooks the fact that a large proportion of income taxpayers benefit from social security.
Shame can hurt, but it can also be used to motivate positive behaviour. Rob/Flickr

The power of public shaming, for good and for ill

Public shaming has a long history and has now gone online through social media. But shame can also be a powerful force to encourage positive behavioural change.
We know whether a play such as Andrew Bovell’s Secret River works onstage – but can we explain its effect? AAP Image/Heidrun Löhr

Need a stage coach? Why some plays work, and others don’t

Anyone who has seen a play can tell you whether it "works" or not – but very few people can tell you exactly why. We all need a better grasp of this. Why? So that playwriting can better represent contemporary Australia.

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