Flinders University

Since its establishment in 1966, Flinders University has enjoyed a well-justified reputation for excellence in teaching and research. It has a long-standing commitment to enhancing educational opportunities for all and a proud record of community engagement.

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If they are simply too large, your tonsils can be shrunk down using special instruments which remove the valleys and crypts. Shutterstock

Curious Kids: Why do we have tonsils?????

Tonsil tissue is particularly important in the first six months of life. After this, our lymph glands take over most of the work and the tonsils are essentially out of a job.
A bough shelter made for the funeral of W. Willika in the remote Northern Territory community of Barunga. Photo: Claire Smith

A grave omission: the quest to identify the dead in remote NT

In remote Northern Territory, most Aboriginal people have been buried in unmarked graves. Archaelogists are carrying out painstaking detective work to help communities find their loved ones' remains.
Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull campaigning at a Tasmania factory for Brett Whiteley, the Liberal candidate in the Braddon by-election. Bob Iddon

Byelection guide: what’s at stake on Super Saturday

On Saturday, five federal seats will have a byelection, with particular attention being paid to tight races in Longman and Braddon. And all have implications for the major parties and their leaders.
Euphanerops, a primitive jawless fish from the World Heritage site at Miguasha, Quebec, which has now been found to have paired hind limb structures and copulatory sex organs. François Miville-Deschênes with permission

The origins of those sexual organs: a fishy tale much more primitive than we thought

Sexual organs similar to what we see in sharks and rays today appeared many millions of years ago in much more primitive ancient fishes than was previously thought.
Tagged European rabbit kitten infected with myxoma virus, but that died from rabbit haemorrhagic virus disease (RHDV). Photo by David Peacock, Biosecurity South Australia

Tandem virus cocktail kills pest rabbits more effectively

Feral rabbits previously exposed to myxoma virus are more likely to be killed by rabbit haemorrhagic diease, meaning that these two biocontrol agents can become even more powerful when used in tandem.
A life reconstruction of Brindabellaspis stensioi, an unusual placoderm fish from the 400-million-year old Burrinjuck reef in New South Wales, Australia. Jason Art, Shenzhen

Fossil fish with platypus-like snout shows that coral reefs have long been evolution hotspots

Brindabellaspis had eyes on the top of the head, facing upwards, and a skull stretched into a long and broad snout. Although around 400 million years old, it was clearly a specialised fish.
Among other things, Greer’s dismissal of “harm” also illustrates how misconceptions about rape inhibit prosecution. Flickr/walnut whippet

Greer is right to say rape law has failings, but wrong to suggest its decriminalisation

The author and academic makes some valid points about rape, but to decriminalise it, as she suggests, fails to recognise bodily autonomy as a key marker of humanity to which women are entitled.
Happy and Holy: Barry Otto as Tockey, Ruth Cracknell as Cecilia McManus, Graham Rowe as Denny, Ron Hadrick as O'Halloran in a 1982 production by the Sydney Theatre Company. Photographer David Wilson.

When the cultural cringe abated: Australian drama in the 1970s

The 1970s transformed Australian drama. It was a time of imaginative brilliance as the Empire wrote back.

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