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Yemen’s al-Qaida branch, called al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, is the most dangerous and sophisticated offshoot of the terror group Osama bin Laden founded in Afghanistan in 1988. AP Photo/Hani Mohammed

Al-Qaida is stronger today than it was on 9/11

Bin Laden's extremist group had less than a hundred members in September 2001. Today it's a transnational terror organization with 40,000 fighters across the Middle East, Africa and beyond.
Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro created a new cryptocurrency called the ‘Petro’ to combat hyperinflation. Reuters/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Is authoritarianism bad for the economy? Ask Venezuela – or Hungary or Turkey

When an elected leader turns autocratic, the economy tends to suffer. That's because, in a functioning democracy, economic policy is made jointly, with lawmakers playing a key role.
Kristen Bell, who has battled depression, has shared her experience of surviving it and thriving. She is pictured here at the 2017 NBCUniversal Upfront in New York on May 15, 2017. JStone/Shutterstock.com

Thriving after depression: Why are scientists ignoring good outcomes?

New research suggests that people who previously suffered from depression can thrive and live happier lives than before. Why aren't more people aware of that?
Gov.-elect Ralph Northam won handily in Virginia with a campaign focused on abortion rights, racial justice and support for immigration. He has black voters and northern Virginia’s diverse suburbs to thank for the victory. Cliff Owen/Reuters

Democrats’ sweep of Virginia shows the state is moving beyond its Confederate past

In Virginia, suburbanites, city-dwellers and black voters together rebuffed racism as an electoral strategy and handed Dems a huge win. Is this diverse coalition the future of Old Dominion politics?
Did Trump’s rhetoric played a part in radicalizing the far-right protesters in Charlottesville? AP Photo/Steve Helber

Charlottesville and the politics of fear

Trump is a master of using anger to motivate his base. An anti-terrorism researcher explains how to stem the tide.
The message might not come through if you put all your communication eggs in one theoretical basket. buydeephoto/Shutterstock.com

Facts versus feelings isn’t the way to think about communicating science

Reports of facts' death have been greatly exaggerated. Effective communication jettisons the false dilemma in favor of a more holistic view of how people take in new information on contentious topics.
A shot of fake news now and your defenses are raised in the future? funnyangel/Shutterstock.com.

Inoculation theory: Using misinformation to fight misinformation

Does science have an answer to science denial? Just as being vaccinated protects you from a later full-blown infection, a bit of misinformation explained could help ward off other cases down the road.
What happens to their credibility when scientists take to the streets? February 2017 Stand Up for Science rally in Boston. Adam Salsman

Can March for Science participants advocate without losing the public’s trust?

The research community tends to assume advocacy doesn't mix with objectivity. One study suggests there's room for scientists to make real-world recommendations without compromising their trusted status.
Senator-elect Todd Young, R-Indiana, thanks supporters after winning his race at an election night rally in Indianapolis. AP Photo/Michael Conroy

Democrats failed to gain a Senate majority, too

Hopes among Democrats of gaining a majority in the Senate were dashed. Here's what a narrow Republican majority might mean moving forward.

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