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Founding Partner Monash University

Monash University was established in 1958 and welcomed its first intake of students in 1961. In its fifty year history, the university has established itself as one of Australia’s finest tertiary institutions, building an enviable reputation for both its outstanding teaching and its transformative research. Today, Monash is Australia’s largest university, boasting a global network of more than 250,000 alumni.

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Articles (1 - 20 of 1,570)

The many colours of visible light just part of what James Clerk Maxwell’s theory was to explain. Flickr/laura peta

Let there be light! Celebrating the theory of electromagnetism

It’s hard to imagine life without mobile phones, radio and television. Yet the discovery of the electromagnetic waves that underpin such technologies grew out of an abstract theory that’s 150 years old…
Australians have high levels of national pride and belonging – much higher than for many comparable countries. EPA/Barbara Walton

Australia, a place of belonging and pride – and some telltale fractures

Every year, come January 26, Australia Day revives the annual dialogue around notions of national identity, our values and what it means to be Australian. It’s an opportune time to reflect on the findings…
Two Australians, Myuran Sukumaran and Andrew Chan, are edging closer to death by firing squad in Indonesia. EPA/Made Nagi

Ticking down to a possible date with executioners

Tick tick tick. Ticking down. Inexorably. To a designated time when I will be blindfolded in a white shirt with a reflective tag over my heart. I will be given three minutes to “calm down”, and have a…
Master OSM 2011/flickr

Facebook – friend or foe?

It’s hard to remember life without social media. I saw my first computer in high school – it was the size of a fridge and didn’t have a keyboard. We had to use cards to enter data. We excitedly programmed…
Today, economists and neuroscientists – not artists – are working out how to make corporations, such as Pixar, more creative. Loren Javier/Flickr

Where do profit and productivity sit in creative economies?

Creativity - variously defined as innovation, critical thinking, and cognitive flexibility amongst others - is ubiquitous these days. From creative corporate conglomerates such as Google and Pixar to primary…
Why aren’t governments more committed to fostering creative inquiry all the way through to high school? AAP/Dan Peled

Creativity in schools sounds good – so what’s the hitch?

British scholar Bill Lucas recently asserted the need for a consistent, appropriate and measurable definition of creativity. In his words: if creativity is to be taken more seriously by educators and educational…
Yemen faces an ongoing insurgency by al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) – one of al-Qaeda’s most active and dangerous branches. EPA/Abdul-Rahman Hwais

Explainer: what is al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula?

As the dust settles on a series of terrorist attacks in France, people will now look to understand the broader players of this grim drama. From their own statements and from external sources, it appears…
Any attack motivated by the pen upon that pen’s purveyor is an attack on free speech.

Charlie Hebdo: the pen must defy the sword, Islamic or not

The slaying of the Charlie Hebdo journalists and cartoonists because of their work is the grossest attack on the value of free speech, and of course the right to life. In the deadly attack on the magazine’s…
She goes, she goes, she just goes: a few bad speech habits seem to have started in Australia. Youtube.com

And, like, she goes ‘yeah, nah’: terminating our bad speech habits

Australians aren’t well known for their articulation. From Kath and Kim to Kylie Mole, we’re the first to poke fun at our poor speech habits. But are our word choices reflecting badly on our common or…
Benedict Cumberbatch plays the wartime codebreaker Alan Turing. The Imitation Game

The Imitation Game: is it history, drama or myth?

The acclaimed new movie The Imitation Game is based on the too-short life of Alan Turing, the British mathematician and “father” of computer science. But how true-to-life is it and what can we learn from…
Wind and humidity affect how easy it is to cool off in a heatwave. Big swimming pools help, too. AAP Image/Dan Peled

Bad luck, Brisbane: muggy cities will feel future heat even more

Several Australian cities, such as Adelaide and Perth, have greeted 2015 with scorching weather as summer hits its stride – the kind of conditions that leave us crying out for an air conditioner, rather…
More and more children are compelled to leave their homelands – with or without their families – in search of asylum. EPA/Hotli Simanjuntak

Unaccompanied children seeking asylum face uncertainty and risk of exploitation

When Karim (not his real name) was a teenager, he travelled from Myanmar to Indonesia as an asylum seeker. Stranded in Java without money and friends, he slept in a mosque for a number of weeks until an…
All over the developed world young people are turning their back on the car. Why is it happening in Australia? AAP/Julian Smith

Why are young Australians turning their back on the car?

Australians have long had a love affair with the car. Car ownership and use has increased every decade since its introduction to Australia. The car has fundamentally shaped the urban form of Australian…
Let’s take a look back through the past 12 months of quantum physics research. sharyn morrow/Flickr

Computing, uncertainty … quantum leaps and bounds of 2014

The past year has provided some of the most interesting developments in quantum mechanics to date. The field is more than 100 years old and has been tested to unimaginable precision, yet some of its most…
The future of company reporting is largely being shaped by the big four accounting firms. Alf Storm/Flickr

Big accounting firms taking the lead on sustainable development

Accountants around the world are currently considering how the organisations they work for can meet the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. As experts in measurement and data controls, analysis, reporting…
Cranking out a tune cements our social networks. Julie/Flickr

All together now – three evolutionary perks of singing

We’re enjoying the one time of year when protests of “I can’t sing!” are laid aside and we sing carols with others. For some this is a once-a-year special event; the rest of the year is left to the professionals…
There is tension between the need for governments to be trusted to govern and the public’s right to know. AAP/Mal Fairclough

FOI reform needed in Victoria amid East West Link fallout

The disclosure of the full business case for the East West road link in Melbourne confirmed what many had suspected – the project is a dud. The release also unequivocally shows that the Victorian Freedom…
Ian Burkhart moves his paralysed hand using the thought-controlled Neurobridge brain implant. Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Nanotechnology to outer space: ten top tech innovations of 2014

Don’t be mesmerised by cool apps and flashy new gizmos – the top technology inventions of the year are ones that will have a lasting effect. Most are advances in fields that are already changing us. Some…

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