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Founding Partner Monash University

Monash University was established in 1958 and welcomed its first intake of students in 1961. In its fifty year history, the university has established itself as one of Australia’s finest tertiary institutions, building an enviable reputation for both its outstanding teaching and its transformative research. Today, Monash is Australia’s largest university, boasting a global network of more than 250,000 alumni.

Monash University is a Founding Partner of The Conversation.

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The need for caution when any anomaly is revealed in new research. Flickr/Adam Gerard

How myths and tabloids feed on anomalies in science

UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH: What do we actually mean by research and how does it help inform our understanding of things? What if research throws up a result that calls for a new way of thinking? How do we…
Patterns of emergence are all around us. Feliciano Guimarães/Flickr

Emergence: the remarkable simplicity of complexity

From the fractal patterns of snowflakes to cellular lifeforms, our universe is full of complex phenomena – but how does this complexity arise? “Emergence” describes the ability of individual components…
Immigration Minister Scott Morrison and Cambodian Deputy Prime Minister Sar Kheng toast the resettlement deal, which has alarmed refugee advocates. EPA/Mak Remissa

Explainer: Does Cambodia refugee deal comply with the convention?

The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Australia and Cambodia raises important questions about Australia’s international legal obligations, the nature of regional refugee protection and resettlement…
Things can and do go wrong when some announcements are mad ahead of time. Flickr/Narshada

The risks of blowing your own trumpet too soon on research

UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH: What do we actually mean by research and how does it help inform our understanding of things? Today a cautionary tale of why you should be careful of some new announcements made…
Treasurer Joe Hockey joins a long line of leaders unable to close the gap between promise and reality. Dave Hunt/AAP

Joe Hockey and the G20 headed for promise fatigue

Governments are notorious for missing targets. Look no further than France or Spain’s recent fiscal calumny, despite the European Union’s excessive deficit procedure. Closer to home, the Association of…
Apple computers could be at risk from the latest Bash bug. Flickr/Oliver

Shell shocked – but what should you do about the Bash bug?

A serious security flaw has been discovered in a ubiquitous utility program present on a wide variety of important computer systems, including many Unix-based servers and Macintosh desktop computers. “Shell…
Sydney fans had much to celebrate after beating Hawthorn in the 2012 AFL Grand at the MCG in Melbourne.Can the Swans do it again this year? AAP Image/Joe Castro

Who will be the weakest link on AFL Grand Final day?

Hawthorn has recovered after a rough patch this season, with key players shaking off injuries and its tenacious coach returning after a health scare. So why have the Hawks earned their spot on Saturday’s…
The shadowy spectre of terrorism magnifies the perceived threat to the point that a fearful public rallies to leaders who promise security. Shutterstock/Oleg Zabielin

Australian Nightmares: the rise of a police state

Possibly the most lamentable outcome of the raised tension and insecurity that has accompanied the theatre of terrorism in Australia is the decline in our political culture, which will last for as many…
US President Barack Obama announces the start of a campaign of allied airstrikes against Islamic State forces in Syria. EPA/Win McNamee

Air power won’t finish off Islamic State, so what comes next?

Having secured some sort of tacit agreement with Damascus, the coalition bombing campaign inside Syria proper has begun in earnest. The US, France and an ambiguous array of allies is unleashing the bleeding…
A protester at recent Australia climate change rallies in the lead up to the UN climate summit in New York. AAP Image/NEWZULU/ZOE REYNOLDS

Australia can get to zero carbon emissions, and grow the economy

Today more than 120 world leaders are gathered in New York for the Climate Leaders’ Summit. With global emissions continuing to rise, it is easy to be pessimistic. But new research released today shows…
No form of assessment is perfect, but when done properly, multiple-choice questions have their benefits. Shutterstock

Why it’s not just assessors who benefit from multiple choice(s)

Think of university assessment and it probably conjures anxiety. As David Boud notes: even successful, able and committed students – those who become university teachers – have been hurt by their experiences…
Professor Ian Harper, chair of the competition review, has surprised some with the review panel’s recommendations. Julian Smith/AAP

Harper competition review seeks widespread change: experts react

Restrictions on retail trading hours, taxis, pharmacies and parallel imports should be lifted according to a far-reaching draft report by the Competition Policy Review. Professor Ian Harper’s new report…
The term ‘medieval’ is being used by politicians to denote others who do not observe modern ‘civilised’ rules and to whom these rules also do not apply. Flickr/Nuno Martins

‘Medieval’ makes a comeback in modern politics. What’s going on?

According to Hansard, in the parliament of John Howard’s first term of government the adjective “medieval” was used eight times. In the following term, however, it cropped up 46 times. What happened? Why…
Essendon faces the prospect of not being able to field a team next year. AAP Image/Julian Smith

ASADA v Essendon: next steps for the winners and losers

Federal Court Justice John Middleton’s decision to uphold the legality of the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) investigation into the potential use of banned substances at the Essendon Football…
There are no lab rats in education research, we have to develop new techniques in the classroom. AAP

Teaching is complex: don’t try to simplify what teachers do

Prominent educator Stephen Dinham recently made some criticisms of primary teaching, some of which I support, but some were too simplistic. His views on educational research and his criticisms of “process…
Bundilla elder Aunty Barbara Raymond with schoolchildren in Darwin last year, supporting the cause of Indigenous constitutional recognition. AAP Image/Supplied by Richard Oppusunggu

Explainer: what Indigenous constitutional recognition means

Constitutional recognition of Indigenous Australia has been on the national agenda for a long time, but is back in the headlines with the news that the Prime Minister and Opposition Leader hope to release…
It’s not funny when it actually happens. Wessel du Plooy/Shutterstock

Why do we still hear people joke about hitting cyclists?

As a community, we are increasingly vigilant about many forms of abuse. Online trolling, school bullying, domestic violence, workplace harassment, racism in sport – all are rightly condemned because of…