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Founding Partner Monash University

Monash University was established in 1958 and welcomed its first intake of students in 1961. In its fifty year history, the university has established itself as one of Australia’s finest tertiary institutions, building an enviable reputation for both its outstanding teaching and its transformative research. Today, Monash is Australia’s largest university, boasting a global network of more than 250,000 alumni.

Monash University is a Founding Partner of The Conversation.

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A Liberian health worker disinfects a street corner where a suspected Ebola patient was picked up by an ambulance. EPA/Ahmed Jallanzo

Infection projections: how the spread of Ebola is calculated

The number of reported Ebola cases is doubling roughly every five weeks in Sierra Leone, and in as little as two to three weeks in Liberia. The number of reported cases globally is projected to reach 10,000…
The Chicago photographer Vivian Maier is the subject of a documentary and an exhibition at this year’s Melbourne Festival. Melbourne Festival

Desiring the author: Finding Vivian Maier at the Melbourne Festival

The Melbourne Festival is running two events dedicated to the recently-discovered American street photographer Vivian Maier. One is the exhibition at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Crossing Paths…
The likelihood of cases presenting in Australia is currently low but we need to be prepared. Dan Peled/AAP

How would Australian hospitals respond to a case of Ebola?

As the Ebola outbreak continues in West Africa, hospitals and health systems are preparing for possible cases in Australia. What would this response look like? Australia has a system of “designated hospitals…
Reforming prime ministers don’t always have the luxury of choice. Julian Smith/AAP

Whitlam made the case for reform: an enduring economic legacy

“Men make history,” Karl Marx wrote in 1859 in his Critique of Political Economy, “but not always in circumstances of their own choosing". Whitlam himself would have chosen a different year to be his time…
AAP/Mick Tsikas

Will Abbott ever ‘be like Gough’?

The greatest tribute that can be paid to Gough Whitlam is the fact that he is so fondly remembered by so many. The affection for Whitlam is contagious for those who admired the vision he had for Australia…
With the progressive delegation of human decisions to machines we need to consider the impact on human autonomy. phloxii/shutterstock

Data mining the new black box of self-driving cars

Autonomous vehicles, or self-driving cars, are likely to be seen more widely on roads in 2015. Already, legislation authorising the use of autonomous vehicles has been introduced in the US states of Nevada…
The Whitlam government’s legacy continues to be felt today, close to four decades since it lost office. AAP/Mick Tsikas

Gough Whitlam’s life and legacy: experts respond

Gough Whitlam, Labor prime minister from 1972 to 1975, has died aged 98. A giant of modern Australian politics, his passing triggered a flood of tributes on Tuesday morning. In a statement, current Labor…
How does a woman make art history, asks !Women Art Revolution, an American documentary that screened at the Melbourne Festival. Melbourne Festival

Just name three female artists: !Women Art Revolution on screen

The central premise of American director Lynn Hershman Leeson’s film !Women Art Revolution (2010), which screened at the Melbourne Festival over the weekend, is summarised near its conclusion: “When artists…
Street Life. (M)/Flickr

KPIs for your life

Anyone who’s worked in a big organisation will know about KPIs – key performance indicators. Numbers to measure how the organisation is functioning. We have dozens in hospitals – time from arrival to discharge…
American-speak is pervading the English language. But is it actually American? Flickr/Okay Yarramanoglu

Are those damned Americanisms really American?

From time to time, Australians complain about the apparent encroachment of Americanisms in our language, and the Brits seem none too happy about it either. George Bernard Shaw famously said: England and…
Recent changes to gambling regulation in Queensland will allow for a rapid expansion of the industry. AAP/Tracey Nearmy

Effective gambling regulation is not just ‘red tape’

The Queensland government has recently implemented changes to poker machine regulation under the banner of “red tape reduction”. Some of these are relatively minor at first glance; others have more obvious…
Only recently discovered, the Burrunan dolphin is now in need of urgent conservation action. AMMCF

Small and isolated dolphin populations are under threat

The Burrunan dolphin, Tursiops australis, has only recently been discovered but is already under threat due to its small and isolated populations. Our team of researchers from the Australian Marine Mammal…
Premier Denis Napthine has acknowledged to the Victorian parliament that homosexual acts between consenting adults should never have been a crime. AAP/Julian Smith

Expunging convictions for gay sex: an old wrong is finally righted

Almost two years ago, The Conversation published an article, “Wiping the slate clean: historic convictions for gay sex must be expunged”. The article discussed the British government’s moves to remove…
There are many different conceptions of God, and endless questions. Waiting For The Word

We don’t know if God exists, but we should keep asking

Disputes about the existence of God — like most disputes about religion, politics, and sex — almost always generate heat but not light. The question of the existence of God seems intractable. As with other…
Come play with us. For ever. And ever. And ever. Alex Eylar

Humilitainment – the sorry story of reality TV

Yesterday the Danish Toymaker Lego announced its plans for a reality TV show to be launched in 2015, rumoured to be based on the idea of Master Builders, the top “construction workers” in the insanely…
The National Curriculum Review prompts more questions than answers and leaves educators unsure of the future. AAP

Curriculum review filled with contradictions

A close reading of Dr Kevin Donnelly and Professor Ken Wiltshire’s review of the Australian Curriculum reveals contradictory messages regarding the future curriculum for primary and secondary schools…
The pragmatic Tony Abbott some expected of him as prime minister has begun to emerge, but Joe Hockey is still on a course of crash or crash through. AAP/Alan Porritt

Government may be learning from mistakes, except for slow learners

A few days ago in a tutorial on political leadership, a student asked me, given my past professional contact with Tony Abbott, if the prime minister has what it takes to be a long-term success in the job…
The reviewers say the Australian Curriculum doesn’t have enough emphasis on our Judeo-Christian heritage and Western influence. What do the experts say? AAP

National curriculum review: experts respond

The much awaited review of the National Curriculum has finally been released with the reviewers calling for more of a focus on Western literature, and recognition of Australia’s “Judeo-Christian” heritage…