Stellenbosch University

Stellenbosch University (SU) is among South Africa’s leading tertiary institutions based on research output, student pass rates and rated scientists, and is recognised internationally as an academic institution of excellence. This is confirmed by two world university rankings after SU was included in the Times Higher Education and QS (Quacquarelli Symonds) world rankings in 2012, for the second consecutive year. In 2011 the University was also listed on the Leiden rankings, and in 2012 SU was named the leading African University by the Webometrics Ranking of World Universities which ranks universities according to their web presence.

SU also boasts the second-highest number of scientists in South Africa who have been ranked by the National Research Foundation (NRF) – 306 in 2012. With 18 research chairs under the NRF South African Research Chairs Initiative (SARChi), the University is regarded as a leader in the fields of biomedical tuberculosis research and management, wine biotechnology, animal sciences and mathematical biosciences. Another SARChi chair, in the field of invasion biology, is shared between SU and the University of Venda. This constitutes but one of SU’s many partnerships, both local and international. As preferred research partner, SU also participates in various international academic networks.

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Residents of Rosettenville burn household goods from alleged drug dens and brothels in the area. Daily Sun/Lucky Morajane

How South Africa can turn the rising tide against vigilantism

Vigilantism challenges the formal boundary between crime and punishment, between law and justice. But its largely been overlooked as a legal topic worthy of in-depth consideration.
Pregnant women in South Africa who live in poor communities are more likely to consider or attempt suicide than the general population. Mike Hutchings/Reuters

How social factors drive up suicide rates among pregnant women

Depression may lead pregnant women to engage in suicidal behaviour. But the socioeconomic contexts pregnant women are in may also contribute to their suicide risk.
A market in Zambia. The Anthropocene in this case looks at the world positively and how to overcome challenges. Shutterstock

Incubating ideas on how southern Africa can manage the Anthropocene

The Anthropocene is often associated with problems such as climate change and inequality. But there is also hope that it can come with positive change for the benefit of people.

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