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University of Cambridge

The University of Cambridge is one of the world’s oldest universities and leading academic centres, and a self-governed community of scholars. Cambridge comprises 31 Colleges and over 150 departments, faculties, schools and other institutions.

Its reputation for outstanding academic achievement is known world-wide and reflects the intellectual achievement of its students, as well as the world-class original research carried out by the staff of the University and the Colleges.

The mission of the University of Cambridge is to contribute to society through the pursuit of education, learning, and research at the highest international levels of excellence.

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Articles (1 - 20 of 150)

King’s College Chapel: beauty, art, profundity – but truth? Tom Thai

Is religion a consolation worth having?

My idea of bliss is a Sunday walk that takes in first some English countryside, and second a pleasant medieval church, with some glass or woodwork or monuments. I once even wrote a piece, published in…
Home to many. tmesis

Jerusalem: where religion divides but lives are entwined

The latest violent episode between Palestinians and Israelis has prompted Israel’s Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu to assert that Israel is in the midst of a “battle for Jerusalem”. This is a city divided…
Prepare children to think. mezzoblue

Why there should be a philosophy GCSE

Our world is built on ideas. We have ideas about how science should be conducted, how a liberal society should defend itself, how discussion is better than conflict, how far toleration should be extended…
Asteroidea Electrica, first prize winner by Adrianus Indrat Aria. Cambridge University

Engineering’s unexpected and microscopic beauty

We all know engineering is useful, functional, even ingenious. But the engineering photography competition we hold each year provides us a chance to wander outside its merely utilitarian aspects into dimensions…
The mantis shrimp has 12 types of visual cones. Klaus Stiefel/Flickr

Inside the colourful world of animal vision

As humans, we live in a colourful world, but differences in visual systems means that not all animals see the world in the same way. Unlike other aspects of an object such as size or mass, colour is not…
Internet access to the cloud wants to be free. phloxii/Shutterstock

Internet services: use public money to help everyone benefit

In the developed world, internet access is getting close to saturation point throughout the population, with the proportion of those online in many countries in the West approaching 80% for fixed broadband…
Average sex worker turns over £100,000 a year – apparently. Walking by Shuttersock

Is prostitution really worth £5.7 billion a year?

The EU has demanded rapid payment of £1.7 billion from the UK because the economy has done better than predicted. Some of this is because the prostitution market is now considered as part of our national…
Volcanism, driven by plate tectonics, built Earth’s atmosphere to make a habitable planet. Simon Redfern/University of Cambridge

How the air we breathe was created by Earth’s tectonic plates

How is it that Earth developed an atmosphere that made the development of life possible? A study published in the journal Nature Geoscience links the origins of Earth’s nitrogen-rich atmosphere to the…
Having a ball: How politicians can make smiley happy people. seanbjack

How to shape economic policy when we move beyond GDP

The day is not far off when the economic problem will take the back seat where it belongs, and the arena of the heart and the head will be occupied or reoccupied, by our real problems – the problems of…
From textbook to real-world application. Labguest

From decisions to disorders: how neuroscience is changing what we know about ourselves

People have wanted to understand our motivations, thoughts and behaviours since the ancient Greeks inscribed “know thyself” on the Temple of Apollo at Delphi. And understanding the brain’s place in health…
In search of better schools. Primary desk via luminaimages/Shutterstock

Scrap school admissions policies based on postcode – they entrench inequality

Why are pupils from disadvantaged families more often found studying in poorly performing schools? Is it the choices their parents make, or are they not able to get into better ones? Perhaps families are…

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