University of Massachusetts Amherst

The University of Massachusetts Amherst, founded in 1863, is the flagship of the five-campus UMass system. Home to the Commonwealth Honors College, UMass Amherst incorporates modern teaching methods involving new communication and information technology, yet remains an immersive, residential campus serving more than 22,000 undergraduate and approximately 6,300 graduate students across a comprehensive array of academic programs.

True to its land-grant roots, UMass Amherst is engaged in research and creative work in all fields and is classified by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching as a doctoral university with the “highest research activity” or R1. Major areas of emphasis include climate science, food science, alternative energy, nanomanufacturing, polymer science, computer science and linguistics.

Together, students and faculty are deeply engaged in collaboration with communities — both regional and international — to improve their social and economic conditions.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 64 articles

Old West, as seen through 1967 Orange County eyes. Orange County Archives

Old West theme parks paint a false picture of pioneer California

Knott's Berry Farm and others romanticize the state's past and influence visitors’ sense of history. But their ideology reflects mid-20th-century political conservatism more than settlers' reality.
Deleon Gambel, 14, fights the current from the overflow of Buffalo Bayou as he makes his way through floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey while checking on neighbors in his apartment complex in Houston, Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. AP Photo/LM Otero

Response to natural disasters like Harvey could be helped with game theory

The number of natural disasters around the world has doubled since 1980, raising serious questions about how to respond. Here's how game theory could help.
FirstNet could relieve emergency workers of having to carry multiple radios and other communications devices. AP Photo/Ric Francis

FirstNet for emergency communications: 6 questions answered

A multibillion-dollar effort is just beginning to build an all-new nationwide wireless broadband network for emergency responders. How will it work, why do we need it and how will it last 25 years?
Decreased regulation has failed to reduce the growing administrative burden of health care. Valeri Potapova/Shutterstock.com

Why market competition has not brought down health care costs

GOP lawmakers say their bills to replace the Affordable Care Act would do a better job than the ACA of controlling rising health care costs, but 40 years of deregulation show it just won't work.
The skyline of Doha, Qatar. Gregory Hawken Kramer

Why have other Gulf states cut ties with Qatar?

Qatar has used its wealth to adopt policies sometimes rivaling Saudi Arabia’s. Think, for example, of the popular Al-Jazeera. Now the Saudis seem determined to limit Qatari influence as much as possible.
Checking the power output of a photovoltaic concentrator array built by Martin Marietta, Inc., at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico. USDOE/Flickr

With a tight federal budget, here’s where to focus clean energy research funding

President Trump's budget reportedly will slash funding for clean energy research and development. An energy expert explains the importance of government support and spotlights some key opportunities.
People watch Father John Misty perform at the 2015 Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in Indio, California. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

Are there too many music festivals?

Music festivals have been a boon to the music industry, but now we're starting to witness some pitfalls of commercial success: consolidation and creeping conformity.
Cruise missile strike against Syria on April 7, 2017. U.S. Navy/via AP

US airstrike on Syria: What next?

Was this a one-off intervention – or a sign that Trump will undertake more of an effort to undermine the Assad regime?
Buddhist monks and family members of victims of the Fukushima tsunami and earthquake face the sea to pray on March 11, 2016 while mourning the victims of the March 11, 2011 disaster. REUTERS/Kyodo

How disaster relief efforts could be improved with game theory

March 11 marks the anniversary of the Fukushima earthquake. Natural disasters here in the US also have wreaked havoc. There may be a way to improve response to these natural disasters.
Indian Muslim woman Shagufta Sayyd prays in Mumbai, India. AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool

Who exactly are ‘radical’ Muslims?

Muslims from the Salafist tradition can often be seen as 'radical.' There is not much understanding of Salafism, its history and its diversity. Here's what it means to be a Salafist.
First Baptist Church Pastor John Crowder leads an open-air Sunday service four days after a deadly fertilizer plant explosion in the town of West, near Waco, Texas, on April 21, 2013. Reuters/Adrees Latif

How much does the Johnson Amendment curtail church freedom?

The Johnson Amendment requires houses of worship to stay away from politics to receive tax exemptions. Yet, their leaders can speak out in a variety of ways that could reflect their religious views.
Sen. Tim Scott waits in line to vote in Hanahan, South Carolina, 2016. AP Photo/Mic Smith

How ‘voter fraud’ crusades undermine voting rights

President Donald Trump is promoting the widely discredited idea of voter fraud. Spreading the myth will make it easier to tighten voter ID laws.

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