University of New England

The University of New England was the first Australian university established outside a capital city. With a history extending back to the 1920s, UNE has a well-earned reputation as one of Australia’s great teaching, training and research universities.

Its graduates consistently rate their experience at UNE highly, a reflection of the University’s commitment to student support. More than 75,000 people now hold UNE qualifications, with many in senior positions in Australia and overseas. UNE has built up its academic profile to the point where it now has more than 500 PhD candidates, an important sign of the University’s academic vigour and rigour.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 144 articles

Keep Calm And Carry On: the mug. hope-in-sight/flickr

Explainer: the terror behind Keep Calm And Carry On

Keep Calm and Carry On is now a pop cultural phenomenon, symbolising the famed British 'stiff upper lip'. But rather than being a nostalgic relic of a reassuring past, Keep Calm should be seen as a symbol of terror.
The Chinese icebreaker Xue Long sails from Fremantle Harbour on its way home from Antarctica. Bahnfrend/Wikimedia Commons

Why Antarctica depends on Australia and China’s alliance

Australia and China both have a keen interest in the frozen continent. And while they don't agree on everything, there is great scope for scientific collaboration.
Angelica Kauffmann, Self-portrait Hesitating between the Arts of Music and Painting, 1791. Wikimedia Commons

It’s time for the ‘science of sensibility’ to return

Finding the art in science and investigating the science of art used to be common practise. At the turn of the 19th century the boundaries between academic disciplines hardened, but now new fields like neuroaesthetics are breaking down barriers.
A 700,000 year-old stone tool excavated by an Indonesian field worker at Mata Menge, Flores. Yinika Perston

How the Hobbits kept their tools as they shrank into island life

New fossil finds show the first large-bodied inhabitants of an isolated Indonesian island evolved to Hobbit-size, but they always remembered how to make and use stone tools.
The regulation of drinking has helped create precisely the violent, misogynistic and law-breaking culture that it was intended to control. John Brack/Wikimedia Commons

Curfews and lockouts: battles over drinking time have a long history in NSW

Since the earliest days of British colonisation, authorities have sought to limit the problems associated with alcohol by licensing its sale and limiting the times and places where it is drunk.
Those opposed to forced municipal mergers have reason to be sceptical of NSW Premier Mike Baird’s promises that it will improve councils' performance. AAP/Paul Miller

Do mergers make for better councils? The evidence is against ‘bigger is better’ for local government

If forced amalgamations proceed, we may well see hundreds of millions of dollars in taxpayer and ratepayer funds squandered simply because policymakers preferred dogma to empirical evidence.
The world can only expect more attacks such that that took place in Brussels, as Islamic State continues to decline and lash out. EPA/Christophe Petit Tesson

Brussels attacks show just how desperate Islamic State has become

Although not an intuitive conclusion, the Brussels attacks are actually indicative of Islamic State's growing decline and desperation.
Friend or foe? Birds that eat almonds can also help clear away unharvested nuts from the tree. FearTec/Wikimedia Commons

Goodies v baddies? Why labelling wild animals as ‘pests’ or ‘friends’ is holding farming back

It’s hard to keep wild animals out of farms. Birds, mammals and insects all affect crop yields, in positive ways (such as flies pollinating flowers) and negative ones (such as when birds damage fruit…

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