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University of New England

The University of New England was the first Australian university established outside a capital city. With a history extending back to the 1920s, UNE has a well-earned reputation as one of Australia’s great teaching, training and research universities.

Its graduates consistently rate their experience at UNE highly, a reflection of the University’s commitment to student support. More than 75,000 people now hold UNE qualifications, with many in senior positions in Australia and overseas. UNE has built up its academic profile to the point where it now has more than 500 PhD candidates, an important sign of the University’s academic vigour and rigour.

The University of New England is a Member of The Conversation.

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Articles (1 - 20 of 73)

The smoke from burning emu bush was used by Indigenous healers for a number of different rituals. Tony Rodd/Flickr

Indigenous medicine – a fusion of ritual and remedy

Indigenous Australian practices, honed over thousands of years, weave science with storytelling. In this Indigenous science series, we look at different aspects of First Australians' traditional life and…
Detail of the engraving on fossil Pseudodon shell (DUB1006-fL) from Trinil. Wim Lustenhouwer, VU University Amsterdam

Marks on an ancient shell lead to a re-think of human history

Zig-zag markings have been discovered on a shell found at Trinil in Java that dates back to between 430,000 and 540,000 years ago, from the site where the original specimens of Homo erectus were found…
Our culture tells women there’s something wrong with them if they don’t orgasm. Gustavo Gomes/Flickr

Female sexual dysfunction or not knowing how to ask for what feels good?

The recently published Italian study suggesting women can only have clitoral, rather than vaginal, orgasms raises important questions about the medicalisation of female sexuality and sexual dysfunction…
The insanity defence is often an option of last resort rather than a lenient alternative to imprisonment. Douglas LeMoine

You’ve seen it on TV – but what is the insanity defence?

What comes to mind when you hear or read about the “insanity defence”? Are the mental images of people who fake insanity to “get away with murder”? Your ideas might have been formed by films such as One…
In matters of ‘security’ social problems, the persistent undesirable condition has been that of the ‘boat people’. AAP/Scott Fisher

Defining deviance: four steps in constructing a threat to security

In matters of national security, who is deviant and poses a threat to our safety depends on the claims made by those in positions of power and the sociopolitical climate. The news media are crucial in…
The Ripper case is important, and not only because of the women who suffered dreadful deaths. Dalibor Levíček

Still a mystery: DNA hasn’t named Jack the Ripper after all

The Jack the Ripper murders are the most potent cold case ever. More than a century on from the first killing in 1888 they are still attracting global attention. Academics of many disciplines publish on…
Positive portrayals of people with mental illness exist in the media but these are the exception rather than the norm. Network Ten

Homeland, Carrie Mathison and mental illness on television

When Homeland first aired in 2011 starring a CIA agent with bipolar disorder, Carrie Mathison (played by Claire Danes), it was commended for its realistic portrayals of people with mental illness. Courtney…
The Gibraltar Museum says scratched patterns found in the Gorham’s Cave, in Gibraltar, are believed to be more than 39,000 years old, dating back to the times of the Neanderthals. EPA/Stewart Finlayson

Is that rock hashtag really the first evidence of Neanderthal art?

There has been much excitement over recent reports that something found in a cave in Gibraltar is the first known example of Neanderthal art. But what exactly has been found, can it be believed and, if…
The author of The Catcher in the Rye wanted privacy – but that hasn’t stopped biographers and memoirists delving into his personal life. Rakka

J.D. Salinger: the outsider everybody wants to get to know

More than 60 years after The Catcher in the Rye was first published, and four years on from his death in 2010, American author J.D. Salinger continues to divide people. He even divides some people from…
Let’s hope the series tackles the big projects in its satirical sweep. Utopia, photo: Hwa Goh, ABC

Working Dog’s Utopia is a welcome satirical treat

Crack open the champagne. The return of Australian satirical drama to ABC television is cause for celebration. Utopia, an eight-part series that launched last week, is the real deal. It offers a high-energy…
Schools supporting children with disabilities need more training and funding, which can be difficult when each state has different definitions of disabilities. Flickr/Andreas Photography

Disability funding in schools shouldn’t be based on state

Inclusive education, where students with disabilities are educated within mainstream classrooms rather than special schools or classes, is widely recognised as being the best way to ensure everyone gets…
An adult black fly with the parasite Onchocerca volvulus coming out of the insect’s antenna. United States Department of Agriculture

How some parasites can end up in your eye and turn you blind

In sub-Saharan Africa and parts of Latin America, there is a parasitic worm that infects about 25m people, causing serious skin diseases, epilepsy and blindness. Known as Onchocerca volvulus, it can live…
Students use everyday objects to decide how they want to learn in a Montessori school. Flick/Kevron

Kids choose their own work in a Montessori classroom

Every day, in classrooms everywhere, teachers grapple with the age-old challenge of how to capture the attention of young people and engage them with the things we think they should know about. In 1907…
Body-snatching crabs is not just for humans. Chesapeake Bay

The crab-castrating parasite that zombifies its prey

Meet Sacculina carcini – a barnacle that makes a living as a real-life body-snatcher of crabs. Unlike most barnacles that are happy to simply stick themselves to a rock and filter food from the water…
Austerity programs were put in place after European governments bailed out their banks. But are they fair on the everyday citizen? Ben Andreas Harding

Do we have austerity obligations?

Governments are reining in spending on welfare, education and health care right across the western world. With the Commission of Audit recommending austerity measures that seemingly point to a tough federal…
Wave of protest: surfers were among thousands who rallied at Cottesloe Beach against the Barnett government’s shark cull. AAP Image/Theron Kirkman

WA shark cull season ends, and ocean users don’t want it to return

The end of April marks the end of Western Australia’s shark cull – for now at least. Since January 25, dozens of sharks (the WA government has not yet released official figures) have been killed off popular…
‘Kiss me under the parasite’ doesn’t have quite the same ring … Schnobby

Good parasite, bad parasite: nature has a job for everyone

Parasites are thought of as free-loaders, but many contribute as much as they take. They service the ecosystem. From an ecological perspective, they are more like tiny, hidden architects that are overlooked…

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