University of New England

The University of New England was the first Australian university established outside a capital city. With a history extending back to the 1920s, UNE has a well-earned reputation as one of Australia’s great teaching, training and research universities.

Its graduates consistently rate their experience at UNE highly, a reflection of the University’s commitment to student support. More than 75,000 people now hold UNE qualifications, with many in senior positions in Australia and overseas. UNE has built up its academic profile to the point where it now has more than 500 PhD candidates, an important sign of the University’s academic vigour and rigour.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 211 articles

The recorder was one of the most popular instruments during the Baroque period, and was more commonly made of wood.

Instrument of torture? In defence of the recorder

Many school music teachers aren't trained recorder players. And cheap and badly made recorders are often sold in discount stores. But this an instrument with a fine musical pedigree.
Success with conservation of Kangaroo Island’s Glossy Black-Cockatoos can now be compared with other bird conservation efforts around the country. Ian Sanderson/Flickr

For the first time we’ve looked at every threatened bird in Australia side-by-side

New research has shown how to measure conservation progress for Australia's 238 endangered bird species
Every magnet has two sides: a north pole and a south pole. Helena/flickr

Curious Kids: How and why do magnets stick together?

The energy needed to pull magnets apart comes from you, and you get it from the food you eat. And the plants or animals you eat get their energy from other plants and animals, or from the Sun. All energy comes from somewhere.
The composition of black and white in a magpie’s poo differs between species. Some splatter more of the uric acid (white), some have more black (indigestible solids). It depends on their diet. Gisela Kaplan

Curious Kids: Why is a magpie’s poo black and white?

Like reptiles, birds do not have two separate exits from the body. They have one, called the cloaca. It is quite similar to the human anus but the cloaca expels both indigestible bits and toxins.
Wetlands can have decades-long dry periods. Felicity Burke/The Conversation

Why a wetland might not be wet

Wetlands in Australia are often dry. They may look unassuming but it's a vital part of their vibrant lifecycle.
Myrmecocystus honeypot ants, showing the repletes, their abdomens swollen to store honey, above ordinary workers. Greg Hume via Wikimedia Commons

Wasps, aphids and ants: the other honey makers

Honey might be synonymous with bees, but they're not the only insects that come up with the goods.
For some young women, a perceived lack of career opportunities is a significant barrier to relocating to rural communities. Dan Peled/AAP

Why young women say no to rural Australia

Research shows that young women are more ambivalent than young men when it comes to employment opportunities and other reasons to relocate to rural communities.
A bee visits an almond flower – an essential process for almond farmers. Tiago J. G. Fernandez/Wikimedia Commons

The farmer wants a hive: inside the world of renting bees

Many fruits, nuts and other crops rely on bees to pollinate their flowers at just the right time of year. Many farmers rent bees to get the job done at pollination time.
False beliefs about language and speech underlie legal precedents that allow jurors to be “assisted” by unreliable transcripts of forensic audio. The Everett Collection/Shutterstock

Legal precedent based on false beliefs proves hard to overturn

Not all false beliefs arise from malicious misinformation. Some legal precedents rest on the status of everyday 'common knowledge', since shown to be false, but embedded in our law nonetheless.

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