University of the Witwatersrand

The University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, also known as Wits University, is a leading, internationally-ranked, research-intensive university located in Johannesburg, South Africa, the economic heartland of Africa. Committed to academic and research excellence and social justice, Wits generates high level scarce skills for a globally competitive world, while addressing local social and economic development. At the forefront of a changing society, Wits is a social leader, dedicated to advancing the public good.

Wits is known for its work in deep level mining, science, health sciences, accountancy, law, governance, and the humanities, amongst others. It houses five faculties which comprise 34 schools. Wits offers approximately 3 600 courses to about 32 500 full-time students, of whom about a third are postgraduate and 55% are female. Almost 65% of all doctoral candidates and about half of all enrolments are in the Science, Engineering and Technology fields. Wits has developed about 130 000 graduates in its 93 years of existence. It has a proud record in that about 87% of all publications are in accredited international journals.

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During his 1966 visit to South Africa, US Senator Robert F Kennedy met with ANC leader Chief Albert Luthuli. Shoreline Productions

The time ‘the other Kennedy’ visited apartheid South Africa

Fifty years ago US Senator Robert F Kennedy visited South Africa. A new documentary about RFK's visit puts the spotlight on an important part of the country's history.
Masked sex workers lead a march to mark International Sex Workers’ Rights Day. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

Debate around sex work in South Africa tilts towards decriminalisation

Sex workers in South Africa are all potential criminals due to the country's regressive laws. But their status may change soon, making South Africa the first African country to decriminalise sex work.
South Africa’s local municipalities can do more to diversify their economies and push their products and services in high tech markets. Shutterstock

A blueprint for bringing local economies to life in South Africa

Through developing their technological skills, South Africa's local municipalities can increase their capacity to compete with markets in neighbouring countries.
Ethiopians reading newspapers in the capital Addis Ababa. The country’s media is among the most repressed on the continent. Reuters/Tiksa Negeri

Press freedom violations undermine African Union’s vision of transparency

Press freedom has changed little in the past decade. If the African Union is to commit to the principles of democracy, it needs to do more to uphold freedom of expression and protects its journalists.
Workers arrange copies of the ‘Business Daily’, produced by Kenya’s Nation Media Group, the biggest newspaper publisher in East Africa. Reuters/Thomas Mukoya

Media freedom has come a long way in Africa, but it’s still precarious

Namibia’s rise in the World Press Freedom rankings is stunning. The media environment in Africa, too, has improved. But media closures and the harassment of journalists are not yet things of the past.
The current model for “good” parenting comes entirely from a Western perspective. Shutterstock

Parenting: why one size doesn’t fit all

Some aspects of good parenting are universal, but others look very different from country to country. There needs to be a better understanding of parenting in different contexts.
High-rise buildings amid shacks in Luanda. President Dos Santo has announced plans to retire amid growing unease among Angolans over deepening poverty despite a recent oil boom. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

Dos Santos maintains the status quo while suggesting change in Angola

Angola's Dos Santos is buying time. His promise to step down is an attempt to diffuse growing political tensions, as repression continues. He might relinquish his position, but not his power.
A river flows into the Indian Ocean along South Africa’s Transkei coast, where residents are resisting a titanium mining project. Epa/Nic Bothma

Local anger is rising against South Africa’s ‘resource curse’

South Africans living in communities along the country's east coast are engaged in intensive protests against mining companies, despite rising danger.

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