University of the Witwatersrand

The University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, also known as Wits University, is a leading, internationally-ranked, research-intensive university located in Johannesburg, South Africa, the economic heartland of Africa. Committed to academic and research excellence and social justice, Wits generates high level scarce skills for a globally competitive world, while addressing local social and economic development. At the forefront of a changing society, Wits is a social leader, dedicated to advancing the public good.

Wits is known for its work in deep level mining, science, health sciences, accountancy, law, governance, and the humanities, amongst others. It houses five faculties which comprise 34 schools. Wits offers approximately 3 600 courses to about 32 500 full-time students, of whom about a third are postgraduate and 55% are female. Almost 65% of all doctoral candidates and about half of all enrolments are in the Science, Engineering and Technology fields. Wits has developed about 130 000 graduates in its 93 years of existence. It has a proud record in that about 87% of all publications are in accredited international journals.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 239 articles

Activists protest the criminalisation of sex work outside the 21st International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa. International AIDS Society/Abhi Indrarajan

Why migration patterns are so important to designing responses to HIV

Mobility is not only a risk factor for HIV – it is also a structural determinant in how HIV responses are designed and implemented.
Trinn Suwannapha/World Bank

Why the International AIDS Conference still matters

The International AIDS Conference is more than just a talk shop. The platform it offers for engagement between governments, scientists and civil society is of undisputable value.
Portrait of Miriam Tlali as part of Adrian Steirn’s 21 Icons South Africa project. Date: 15.10.2014. Adrian Steirn/Courtesy of 21 Icons South Africa

Under the influence of … the Black Consciousness novel ‘Amandla’

A South African novel, published in 1980 and dealing with the Soweto student uprising four years earlier, still provides lessons for students today.
Some countries in Africa are well placed to follow the path of development pioneered by a number of Asian countries. Shutterstock

What’s needed to take Africa from Third to First World in 25 years

It's important to interrogate the key factors that pushed countries from Third World to First World status in the 20th century. Asia's experiences hold many lessons for Africa.
Is a Zika vaccine being tested ahead of vaccines for other flaviviruses because Zika’s occurring in the context of an international sporting competition? Christian Bruna/AAP

News of Zika vaccine might be reassuring, but it’s too late for Rio, and do we really need it anyway?

Recently two events concerning the Zika epidemic coincided: two potential vaccines against the virus were declared a success when used in mice, and Jason Day withdrew from the Olympic Games.
The cover art of ‘Bitches Brew’ by Mati Klarwein. Artist's website

Under the influence of … Miles Davis’ electric masterpieces

‘Bitches Brew’ and ‘Live-Evil’, two albums from Miles Davis’ electric period, have more than musicological significance. They challenge the listener to think beyond aesthetics and form.
Rioters threw stones and looted shops during a recent protest at the Phomolong informal settlement outside Pretoria. Reuters/Striger

The link between public violence and xenophobia in South Africa

The past decade has shown a strong connection between political protests and the looting of foreign-owned shops in South Africa. Research shows that local leaders use protests to maintain their power.
Markets plunged after the UK voted to exit the EU. Africa’s trade relations with both the EU and UK will be affected by the decision. Reuters/Kevin Coombs

African exporters face choppy waters in the wake of Brexit

Emerging market countries that rely heavily on commodity exports will be hit hardest by Britain's decision to leave the European Union.
South African President Jacob Zuma inflated the size of his cabinet, making it among the largest in the world. GCIS

Why South Africa would do well to fire all its deputy ministers

Although not a panacea, cutting down the number of deputy ministers would go a long way to helping government get its finances onto a more stable footing.

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