University of the Witwatersrand

The University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, also known as Wits University, is a leading, internationally-ranked, research-intensive university located in Johannesburg, South Africa, the economic heartland of Africa. Committed to academic and research excellence and social justice, Wits generates high level scarce skills for a globally competitive world, while addressing local social and economic development. At the forefront of a changing society, Wits is a social leader, dedicated to advancing the public good.

Wits is known for its work in deep level mining, science, health sciences, accountancy, law, governance, and the humanities, amongst others. It houses five faculties which comprise 34 schools. Wits offers approximately 3 600 courses to about 32 500 full-time students, of whom about a third are postgraduate and 55% are female. Almost 65% of all doctoral candidates and about half of all enrolments are in the Science, Engineering and Technology fields. Wits has developed about 130 000 graduates in its 93 years of existence. It has a proud record in that about 87% of all publications are in accredited international journals.

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Chinese President Xi Jinping at the recent Asian-African Conference in Jakarta. Reuters/Darren Whiteside

Africa offers a point of cooperation for Xi and Trump

If US President Donald Trump is the consummate dealmaker he purports to be, he should find the low risk, high returns of greater US-China-Africa cooperation irresistible.
South African children in Kwa-Zulu Natal walk to the last tap with running water after other communal taps were cut off due to drought. Reuters/Rogan Ward

South Africa is no longer the poster child for providing access to safe water

South Africa did a brilliant job of increasing access to safe water for millions of people after the first democratic elections in 1994. But it hasn't kept up the good work.
Workers walk past a Lonmin Marikana platinum mine, a site that represents industrial strife in South Africa. Reuters/Skyler Reid

How South Africa’s mining industry can change its ways

South Africa's mining industry is on an unsustainable trajectory and needs to undergo fundamental transformation that emphasises transparency, equity, and community participation.
Portrait of Miriam Tlali as part of Adrian Steirn’s 21 Icons South Africa project. Date: 15.10.2014. Adrian Steirn/Courtesy of 21 Icons South Africa

Rest in power, Miriam Tlali: author, enemy of apartheid and feminist

Author Miriam Tlali was an intersectional feminist long before this term was coined or its politics made fashionable in South Africa by student movements.
The 28th Assembly of Heads of State and Government of the African Union in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. GCIS

How the African Union’s planned overhaul may affect its ties with China

The African Union is changing the way it does business. Its new reforms, led by Rwandan President, Paul Kagame, call for fewer strategic priorities and addressing bureaucratic bottlenecks.
South Africa’s Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan delivers his 2017 budget speech. Reuters/Mike Hutchings

South Africa’s budget: some good moves, but not enough to fix mounting problems

South Africa’s finance minister Pravin Gordhan delivered the country’s annual budget amid growing concerns about slow economic growth, the unequal distribution of wealth and a widening budget deficit…
Workers at Medupi coal-fired power station during its construction, one of South Africa’s most costly and environmentally unfriendly projects. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

Steering South Africa’s budget between excess patronage and prudence

In preparing the 2017 national budget South Africa needs to take heed of warnings that its historical austerity measures are hurting the poor and even costing lives.
President Jacob Zuma delivers his state of the nation address in Cape Town. Critics say he failed to galvanise the nation. Reuters/Sumaya Hisham

Zuma had a chance to galvanise South Africans. He blew it

South African President, Jacob Zuma, wasted lots of time and space in cheap politicking instead of galvanising South Africans to work together for a better future.
An ill Anna Bosigo is fed by volunteer worker Lydia Mbhalo in the Orange Farm township, south of Johannesburg. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

South Africa isn’t budgeting for its care economy. What can be done about it

Social welfare budgets have simply not been adequate to plug decades’ worth of under-resourcing, especially in black communities. It's a good place for government to start giving life to its slogans
Sexuality presents us with personal and private concerns that are also very political. Shutterstock

Of love letters and other gestures of romantic love

Perhaps we can think of the love letter and other gestures of romantic love as forms or techniques that mediate the violence of time, dispossession and exclusion.

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