University of the Witwatersrand

The University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, also known as Wits University, is a leading, internationally-ranked, research-intensive university located in Johannesburg, South Africa, the economic heartland of Africa. Committed to academic and research excellence and social justice, Wits generates high level scarce skills for a globally competitive world, while addressing local social and economic development. At the forefront of a changing society, Wits is a social leader, dedicated to advancing the public good.

Wits is known for its work in deep level mining, science, health sciences, accountancy, law, governance, and the humanities, amongst others. It houses five faculties which comprise 34 schools. Wits offers approximately 3 600 courses to about 32 500 full-time students, of whom about a third are postgraduate and 55% are female. Almost 65% of all doctoral candidates and about half of all enrolments are in the Science, Engineering and Technology fields. Wits has developed about 130 000 graduates in its 93 years of existence. It has a proud record in that about 87% of all publications are in accredited international journals.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 745 articles

People affected by xenophobic violence queue prior to being transported back to their countries from Johannesburg, South Africa. Kim Ludbrook/EPA-EFE

Telling the complex story of ‘medical xenophobia’ in South Africa

The experiences of non-nationals in South Africa’s public health care system are more complex and varied than implied by the dominant discourse on "medical xenophobia"
Helen Zille’s return to the top echelons of the Democratic Alliance has been slammed as an attempt to make the party white again. EFE-EPA/Nic Bothma

Party’s woes signify historical dilemma of South Africa’s liberals

The Democratic Alliance’s problems can be traced back to the politicisation of race, which has persisted even after the dawn of democracy in 1994.
A cemetery in Phola, a black residential area near Witbank, to which some graves were relocated to make way for coal mining. Supplied

Mining activities continue to dispossess black families in South Africa

Mining companies and some heritage consultants don't understand the sacredness attached to ancestral remains, and the meaning of land in African communities.
Cadaver-based teaching prepares students intellectually and emotionally to deal with the challenges they will face in their health sciences careers. Dr Tobias Houlton

Health professionals and cadavers: the quest for an ethical approach

Dissection is important for developing a range of skills, as well as moral and ethical training and a humanistic approach to patient care.

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