University of the Witwatersrand

The University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, also known as Wits University, is a leading, internationally-ranked, research-intensive university located in Johannesburg, South Africa, the economic heartland of Africa. Committed to academic and research excellence and social justice, Wits generates high level scarce skills for a globally competitive world, while addressing local social and economic development. At the forefront of a changing society, Wits is a social leader, dedicated to advancing the public good.

Wits is known for its work in deep level mining, science, health sciences, accountancy, law, governance, and the humanities, amongst others. It houses five faculties which comprise 34 schools. Wits offers approximately 3 600 courses to about 32 500 full-time students, of whom about a third are postgraduate and 55% are female. Almost 65% of all doctoral candidates and about half of all enrolments are in the Science, Engineering and Technology fields. Wits has developed about 130 000 graduates in its 93 years of existence. It has a proud record in that about 87% of all publications are in accredited international journals.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 258 articles

Nikki Hamblin of New Zealand stops running during the 5000m race to help Abbey D'Agostino of the USA after D'Agostino suffered a cramp. Kai Pfaffenbach/Reuters

Secular transcendence for couch potatoes? Why we love sport’s narratives

Although the Olympics have come to an end, fans will continue to be gripped by the infinite micro-narratives that sports fixtures provide. But are these narratives comparable to literary creativity?
Podcasts are emerging as an arguably easy-to-access, affordable mode of creating new spaces for discussion and debate. Shutterstock

Podcasts can drive debate and break down academia’s ivory towers

The podcast has emerged as a promising medium for facilitating ongoing debate about issues that need more time than mainstream, profit-oriented media or the changing tides of hashtags might allow.
Herman Mashaba, businessman and member of the Democratic Alliance, now mayor of Johannesburg. Jurgen Marx

Business people can make great politicians, but …

Business people who become politicians can bring fresh energy into the public service. They come from an ecosystem that is driven by urgency to produce measurable results.
Protesters decry the decision by the South African Broadcasting Corporation not to air scenes of violent protest. Reuters/Mike Hutchings

Questions that need to be asked to save South Africa’s public broadcaster

There were high hopes that the SABC would become a true public broadcaster after the end of apartheid when it was used ruthlessly as a propaganda machine. But those hopes have since been dashed.
President Jacob Zuma, Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa and former anti-apartheid activist Sophie de Bruyn at the unveiling of a monument to the 1956 women’s march. GCIS

Local elections show that South Africa’s women continue to play second fiddle

South Africa's past tells us that, under certain conditions, women mobilise in ways that produce significant political results. But the country's present shows how easily these gains can evaporate.
South African President Jacob Zuma reacts during the official announcement of the municipal election results in Pretoria. Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters

Message to white South African voters: Keep calm … and shut up!

Various commentators have wrongly over the last 22 years said that black people voted blindly for ANC governments. There's no better example why the academy needs a dramatic post-colonial overhaul.
Supporters of South Africa’s governing ANC with a mock coffin of the opposition EFF at the ANC’s Siyanqoba rally ahead of local elections. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

Electoral tremors are shaking South Africa’s ANC. How will it respond?

The ANC has faced an inexorable, gradual decline in support since 2004. There is no evidence that it has been able to reverse this trend.
Family murder was understood as a sign of larger ills. Shutterstock

Familicides – how apartheid killed its own

During the 1980s, press coverage of South African family murders suggested that something was ‘wrong’ with white society – and with the white Afrikaans men who were usually seen as perpetrators.

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