University of the Witwatersrand

The University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, also known as Wits University, is a leading, internationally-ranked, research-intensive university located in Johannesburg, South Africa, the economic heartland of Africa. Committed to academic and research excellence and social justice, Wits generates high level scarce skills for a globally competitive world, while addressing local social and economic development. At the forefront of a changing society, Wits is a social leader, dedicated to advancing the public good.

Wits is known for its work in deep level mining, science, health sciences, accountancy, law, governance, and the humanities, amongst others. It houses five faculties which comprise 34 schools. Wits offers approximately 3 600 courses to about 32 500 full-time students, of whom about a third are postgraduate and 55% are female. Almost 65% of all doctoral candidates and about half of all enrolments are in the Science, Engineering and Technology fields. Wits has developed about 130 000 graduates in its 93 years of existence. It has a proud record in that about 87% of all publications are in accredited international journals.

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Displaying 21 - 40 of 752 articles

Cadaver-based teaching prepares students intellectually and emotionally to deal with the challenges they will face in their health sciences careers. Dr Tobias Houlton

Health professionals and cadavers: the quest for an ethical approach

Dissection is important for developing a range of skills, as well as moral and ethical training and a humanistic approach to patient care.
Ageing increases the risk of non-communicable diseases. Shutterstock

Taking the long view on health: tracking the impact of ageing in rural South Africa

Rapid population ageing has prompted researchers to study disease trends in older South Africans. The aim is to understand the role that specific health conditions play in ageing among rural people.
The relationship between income and health underlines the need for strong government policies to break the cycle. Shutterstock

South African study shows how unhealthy ageing takes its toll on health and income

It's evident from research that while health influences economic well-being, the inverse is also true, economic well-being influences health.

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