University of the Witwatersrand

The University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, also known as Wits University, is a leading, internationally-ranked, research-intensive university located in Johannesburg, South Africa, the economic heartland of Africa. Committed to academic and research excellence and social justice, Wits generates high level scarce skills for a globally competitive world, while addressing local social and economic development. At the forefront of a changing society, Wits is a social leader, dedicated to advancing the public good.

Wits is known for its work in deep level mining, science, health sciences, accountancy, law, governance, and the humanities, amongst others. It houses five faculties which comprise 34 schools. Wits offers approximately 3 600 courses to about 32 500 full-time students, of whom about a third are postgraduate and 55% are female. Almost 65% of all doctoral candidates and about half of all enrolments are in the Science, Engineering and Technology fields. Wits has developed about 130 000 graduates in its 93 years of existence. It has a proud record in that about 87% of all publications are in accredited international journals.

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Displaying 401 - 420 of 445 articles

Some of the equipment used during a Pap smear procedure. Pap smears are at the centre of the South African government’s cervical cancer prevention strategy, despite it yielding little success. shutterstock

Failure to set up affordable cervical cancer tests costs South Africa

South Africa's cervical cancer strategy has not yielded great results. Despite this, the country has still not opted for an alternative screening methods.
When children are bombarded with outside noises, it becomes harder to hear in class – and to learn. From www.shutterstock.com

Dropping the volume around schools can improve learning

Chronic environmental noise, like cars zooming past or airplanes overhead, can make children struggle with reading comprehension and affect their memory.
A protestor at a demonstration against rape. Rape statistics collected by the police do not reflect the high levels of under-reporting. Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters

Rewriting the script around South Africa’s rape statistics

South Africa needs a new rape policy that will change the way the police collect statistics.
The challenge for new African Development Bank President Akinwumi Adesina is to ensure that it develops its own Africa-relevant solutions to the continent’s problems. Reuters/Luc Gnago

African Development Bank must gear up for a more proactive role

As the African Development Bank Group changes leadership, Africa's multilateral financier must chart a new course, including raising the contribution and voice of Africans in the institution.
Southern Africa has rivers, like the Zambezi, that run through a number of countries. How best to manage this is the challenge. Goran Tomasevic/Reuters

Time to allow water management to take its own course

Southern African countries do not face water scarcity and do not need to build joint water projects. But they do need talk to each other to avoid misunderstandings.
Spectacular landscape of the Nuweveld escarpment showing exposures of the Beaufort Group. SUPPLIED

Why South Africa’s Karoo is a palaeontological wonderland

The Karoo provides not only a historical record of biological change over a period of Earth’s history but also a means to test theories of evolutionary processes over long periods of time.
Sudan President Omar al-Bashir (L) ahead of the African Union summit in Johannesburg. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

Why a great deal hangs on Al-Bashir’s fate in South Africa

As a signatory to the Rome Statute, South Africa is obliged to arrest Omar al-Bashir and end his status as a fugitive from international law for war crimes allegedly committed in the conflict in Darfur.
Activists attend Uganda’s first gay pride parade at the Entebbe Botanical Gardens in Kampala, Uganda, in August 2012. Rachel Adams/EPA

Explainer: tackling the stigma and myths around sexuality

Science shows that thinking about sexuality in a binary fashion of hetero/homosexual is no longer accurate. Rather, evidence shows that there is a diversity of human sexuality and sexual orientations.
Eradicating TB across the globe by 2035, as the World Health Organisation hopes to do, will only take place if the global funding and will improves. Supplied

TB is treatable and curable: with the right will it can be eradicated

More than 1.5 million people die of tuberculosis across the world every year. Although testing and screening has improved and more drugs are available, it is not enough to conquer the scourge.
Muhammadu Buhari’s victory in Nigeria emboldens him to play a leading role in African affairs. Reuters

Why Africa needs Buhari and Zuma to forge a strong alliance

Former presidents Thabo Mbeki and Olusegun Obasanjo led confidently on African affairs because they were elected by comfortable majorities at home and had solid control of their political parties.
The language that’s spoken in science classrooms is very different to every day English – even mother tongue English speakers may struggle because of this. From www.shutterstock.com

Helping learners become fluent in the language of science classrooms

We view school science as largely a practical subject, but pupils must understand the language of science – which is often very different from every day language – if they are to excel.
Oprah Winfrey’s academy for girls in South Africa is well-resourced and produces good results. These factors mean it is in the minority. Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters

Private vs public schools: it’s not a simple numbers game

Parents want to know how much they need to spend to secure a good education - and job prospects - for their children. But is it as simple as balancing your own books and ignoring the bigger picture?
Unless Africa can manage the effects of climate change, the agricultural future for many African’s looks bleak. Siegfried Modola/Reuters

What Africa can do to manage the fallout of climate change

Unless Africa can manage the effects of climate change, the agricultural future for many Africans looks bleak.
A new collection of essays explores the role of books in founding and dismantling The British empire. Shutterstock

The books that shaped the rise and fall of the British empire

Books have active political lives. They inspire social movements and bind people together. Books can stand as short-hand symbols for larger galaxies of ideas.

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