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Articles (1 - 20 of 1,016)

Words such as ‘remote’ and ‘communities’ are often employed – but we’re talking about people’s homes. AAP Image/NewZulu/Jesse Roberts

Closing ‘communities’ undermines the humanity of Aboriginal lives

Up to 150 'communities' in 'remote' Australia are threatened with closure. But do such terms put a gloss on what is, in reality, the closure of people's homes?
Marine parks are valuable tools to help safeguard species such as seagrasses. AAP Image/James Cook University

Why are Australia’s marine parks being reviewed so soon after they were signed off?

Australia's network of marine parks - a decade in the making and announced in 2012 - haven't been implemented yet, and the Abbott government has already placed the plans under review. Why the hurry?
AAP/Antonio Melita

Zones of peace and turmoil

More than 20 years ago, two American academics, Max Singer and Aaron Wildavsky, wrote about what they described as The Real World Order: Zones of Peace/Zones of Turmoil. As is the way with such things…
Premier Colin Barnett addresses a rally outside Parliament House, the latest in a long history of protests at Indigenous deaths in custody and high rates of incarceration. AAP/Newzulu/Jesse Roberts

State of imprisonment: lopsided incarceration rates blight West

Indigenous people are jailed at a rate 18 times that of non-Aboriginal Western Australian adults, but the overall rate is high too. The great costs of this punitive approach yield few clear benefits.
AAP/Alan Porritt

Competing interests and the crisis of governance

In comedy timing is everything. So, too, in politics. In good times governing is – or ought to be – pretty straightforward. How hard can it be to divide up the windfall gains from a mining boom, for example…
Miriam Stannage, The White House [chainsaw], 1999, digital photograph. Copyright and courtesy of the artist.

Watching the watchmen: when artists stare back at CCTV

As governments gain greater access to private information there is a need to protect our freedoms. Artists can make a distinct contribution to this debate by offering alternative perspectives.
All by myself: Mark Latham was ultimately relieved to escape the life of a politician. AAP/Alan Porritt

Book review: The Latham Diaries, ten years on

The Latham Diaries remains a seminal piece – not only having revealed the ALP's inner workings, but having highlighted policy issues and structural problems which continue to be of concern.
EPA/Laurent Gillieron

Jaw-jaw still beats war-war

Churchill’s famous aphorism that it’s better to jaw-jaw than to war-war has never been more apposite or timely. Although the usual suspects are queueing up to criticise the agreement between Iran and various…
AAP/Gabrielle Brassard-Lecours

Is capitalism killing us?

Modern life is full of ironies, paradoxes and what Marxists used to call “contradictions”. Perhaps the greatest contradiction of all time is the possibility that the capitalist system is not only incompatible…
Conservative Christians and evangelicals might want to claim freehold over the Bible – but it’s a text for many readers, even atheists. Bobby McKay/Flickr

Religion par excellence: can the Bible be useful to atheists?

Why does an atheist literary scholar need to know about the Bible? It's a text with innumerable interpretative possibilities that allows readers to connect 'the apparently unconnectable'.

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