Articles on Brazil

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Brazil’s gutted National Museum now resembles an archaeological ruin itself. AP Photo/Mario Lobao

Lesson from Brazil: Museums are not forever

It's a comforting falsehood that once an artifact joins a museum's collection, it's safe for eternity. Museums face many foes in the fight to preserve – a lack of funds might be the biggest.
In Rome, 70 per cent of ingredients in school meals are required by law to be organic. In Brazil, food is a constitutional right for children. Canada lags shamefully behind. (Shutterstock)

How to make a national school food program happen

There would be many benefits from a national school food program, including a chance to teach children healthy eating habits that could last a lifetime. Why can't it happen?
Sections of a Brazilian slave ship from the 19th century. Robert Walsh, as shown on www.slaveryimages.org, compiled by Jerome Handler and Michael Tuite and sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities." caption="A Brazilian slave ship from the 19th century." zoomable="true

Transatlantic slave trade was not entirely ‘triangular’ – countries in the Americas sent ships out too

Merchants from Brazil, Cuba, North America and the British West Indies traded goods grown by slaves on plantations, for more slaves.
Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez was a major financier of Nicaragua’s Daniel Ortega, seen here at a 2016 commemoration on the third anniversary of the socialist leader’s death. Reuters/Marco Bello

Venezuelan oil fueled the rise and fall of Nicaragua’s Ortega regime

Cheap Venezuelan oil boosted Nicaragua's economy and funded President Daniel Ortega's many anti-poverty programs. With Venezuela in crisis, the oil has dried up – as has support for Ortega's regime.
A global survey claims South Africans don’t trust their police. EPA/Nic Bothma

Why the global survey on safety is deeply flawed

The Law and Order Index says South Africans feel less secure than people in Yemen, the DRC and Libya, countries all affected by violent conflict.
The divisive right-wing Brazilian presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro, seen in here on a campaign poster, is often likened to Donald Trump. Some supporters take pride in the comparison. Reuters/Ricardo Moraes

Brazilian evangelicals, swinging hard to the right, could put a Trump-like populist in the presidency

Brazil's evangelical Christians are an increasingly powerful political force. These conservative, faith-based voters are now backing a divisive firebrand known for racist remarks for the presidency.

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