Articles on Ecosystem services

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Australia’s Purnululu National Park is a World Heritage wilderness, but many other pristine places lack similar protection. AAP Image/Tourism Australia

Earth’s wildernesses are disappearing, and not enough of them are World Heritage-listed

Wilderness areas are vitally important, yet are largely overlooked by the United Nations' list of natural World Heritage. This week's meeting in Poland is a chance to redress that balance.
The High Line in New York City, a former elevated railroad trestle converted to a public park. Shinya Suzuki/Flickr

Urban nature: What kinds of plants and wildlife flourish in cities?

In an urbanizing world, people increasingly are seeking out nature in cities. Research shows that diverse species of animals, plants and insects can thrive in areas that humans have altered.
Clean water and access to food are two of the most priceless ecosystem services.

Without action, Asia-Pacific ecosystems could lose a third of their value by 2050

Current land-use patterns could see the value of 'ecosystem services' – the natural processes that sustain life – plummet by mid-century. But with the right policies we can turn this trend around.
We need other species to survive for the services they provide and the knowledge they can share. Global Environment Facility

Why we need a ‘moon shot’ to catalogue the Earth’s biodiversity

The presidential candidates should be talking about exploring and cataloguing our biosphere, which holds vital clues for how humanity should navigate the future.
Spiny water flea (Bythotrephes longimanus). Jake R. Walsh

Tiny flea reveals the devastating costs of invasive species

Invasive species cause some $120 billion in damages across North America yearly -- and that's just direct costs. A study of one species in one Wisconsin lake indicates the real toll is much higher.
Free pollination services: a bee at an almond orchard in California. Randy Stiefer

Bringing scientific rigor to ‘ecosystem services’

Forests, wetlands, wildlife, waterways all provide valuable services to society. Would we take better conserve natural resources if we paid for these ecosystem services?
TERN operates a number of flux towers that measure energy, water and carbon dioxide fluxes and their drivers in the vast expanse of northern Australia.

Research infrastructure cuts would hit the Top End hard

The NCRIS-funded Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) benefits pastoralists, business, tourism and Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory. Cutting it will hurt them all.

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