Sections

Services

Information

UK United Kingdom

History

Analysis and Comment (141)

Today’s young Australians are the smiling symbols of the embrace of multicultural identity, the nation’s defining moment. Today’s young Australians are the smiling symbols of the embrace of multicultural identity, the nation’s defining moment. Flickr/DIBP Images, Faces of Australia

Modern Australia’s defining moment came long after First Fleet

The culture wars that dominated the narrative during John Howard’s prime ministership have returned with the ascension of his self-described “political love child”, Tony Abbott. While Abbott is sometimes…
Frederick Waddy’s caricature of Anthony Trollope, the man who offended so many Australians with his assessment of our ways. Frederick Waddy’s caricature of Anthony Trollope, the man who offended so many Australians with his assessment of our ways. Wikimedia Commons

Celebrity blows: Anthony Trollope and those touchy colonials

The Australian press has long been fascinated by the opinion that visiting celebrities hold about Australia. This obsession was excited by the written observations of Mark Twain, who visited in 1896, and…
The many faces of Edinburgh’s festivals. The many faces of Edinburgh’s festivals. <p&p>/Flickr

A tale of two festivals: the history of the Edinburgh Fringe

Today, Edinburgh is known around the world for its festivals. Indeed, the Edinburgh International Festival just sold over 13,000 tickets for its first weekend – a new record. But in 1947, when the festival…
After 70 years, Don Carter (back row, fourth from right, with his cousins Darryl Watson in front of him and Donald Carter jnr beside him) finally met his extended family at a reunion in Williamsburg, Virginia, in 2013. After 70 years, Don Carter (back row, fourth from right, with his cousins Darryl Watson in front of him and Donald Carter jnr beside him) finally met his extended family at a reunion in Williamsburg, Virginia, in 2013. Margaret Carter

Children born of war: a neglected legacy of troops among civilians

New kinds of histories are raising alternative stories that temper the celebratory focus of conventional war histories. These are putting new emphasis on the costs of war in economic and human terms, and…
A new exhibition at New Norcia in Western Australia sheds new life on the extraordinary life of the historic township’s founder. A new exhibition at New Norcia in Western Australia sheds new life on the extraordinary life of the historic township’s founder. New Norcia Museum and Art Gallery

New images of New Norcia, a Spanish mission in the bush

Driving from Perth to New Norcia to see a new exhibition devoted to the township’s founder, Bishop Rosendo Salvado, takes about two hours. It’s an enjoyable trip, cutting through the wide expanse of countryside…
Ready, but not necessarily equipped. Ready, but not necessarily equipped. Phillip Capper

Was Europe really ready for World War I?

How prepared were the Great Powers for war in 1914? Too often, this question has been answered by pointing to expectations of a short war, and to muddle and inefficiency in its opening stages. The realities…
The First World War has different resonance and meaning across the Commonwealth nations, which should be reflected in the UK and Scottish government’s commemoration plans. The First World War has different resonance and meaning across the Commonwealth nations, which should be reflected in the UK and Scottish government’s commemoration plans. EPA/Andy Rain

UK WWI commemorations should embrace Commonwealth experience

Scottish first minister Alex Salmond’s speech at the recent UK and Commonwealth First World War centenary commemoration subtly emphasised its politicised nature. At no point did he use the term “British…
‘Memorial diplomacy’, on display in June’s D-Day commemorations, is a mode of symbolic soft power politics which uses sites of memory and commemorative events to boost relations. ‘Memorial diplomacy’, on display in June’s D-Day commemorations, is a mode of symbolic soft power politics which uses sites of memory and commemorative events to boost relations. AAP

The WWI centenary in France and the diplomacy of shared memory

When French president François Hollande rose to deliver the keynote address for the 70th anniversary of the D-Day Landings earlier this year, he set in motion an unprecedented five-year cycle of commemoration…
A field of poppies, symbolising the soldiers' sacrifice, has been sown in Northwood, London, for the centenary of the First World War, but the civilian losses are no less worthy of remembrance. A field of poppies, symbolising the soldiers' sacrifice, has been sown in Northwood, London, for the centenary of the First World War, but the civilian losses are no less worthy of remembrance. AAP/Newzulu/Stephen Chung

On Hiroshima Day, remember the civilian victims of ‘total war’

Hiroshima Day is the closest we come to a day that focuses on the plight of civilians in war. The two atomic bombs dropped on Japan immediately killed over 120,000 civilians, but over the years the day…
Germans today have little appetite for constructing new national myths about the Great War, or reclaiming old ones, because of painful associations with the more recent past. Germans today have little appetite for constructing new national myths about the Great War, or reclaiming old ones, because of painful associations with the more recent past. Robert Scarth/Flickr

Why the Great War centenary will be a non-issue in Germany

There is not much of a question of who controls the national myth of the Great War in Germany today. Nobody in particular seems to want to claim it. More interesting, however, is considering who has sought…
Flanders Fields was once the frontline of war – it now is a place of remembrance. Flanders Fields was once the frontline of war – it now is a place of remembrance. Mark Wainwright/Flickr

WWI commemorations in Belgium give a glimpse of a divided nation

In Belgium as in Australia, there are no longer any surviving veterans of the Great War to witness the commemorations of its centenary. However, just as in Australia, there remains an immense interest…
In recent years, the service of troops from France’s then-colonies in both world wars has been the object of sustained presidential attention. In recent years, the service of troops from France’s then-colonies in both world wars has been the object of sustained presidential attention. EPA/Philippe Wojazer

Reconciliation or récupération? Indigenous soldiers in WWI

In vogue among the political left during the events in Paris in May 1968, the French term récupération refers to the danger of “the Establishment”, be it the government or a political party, seizing on…
Many parties have a vested interest in shaping the way we remember the Great War ahead of its centenary, but some are more equal than others. Many parties have a vested interest in shaping the way we remember the Great War ahead of its centenary, but some are more equal than others. EPA/Thomas Bregardis

Who owns the myths and legends of the Great War centenary?

When prime minister Tony Abbott declared at Villers-Bretonneux that “no place on earth has been more densely sown with Australian sacrifice than these fields in France”, Australian attention focused again…
Serbian infantry, 1914. Serbian infantry, 1914.

World War I: in the beginning …

With the exquisite turn of phrase for which she was so highly regarded, Barbara Tuchman once likened the Austro-Hungarian declaration of war against Serbia of 28 July 1914 to an example of “the bellicose…
The Wall of Death at the former Auschwitz concentration camp – a place for solemnity, not smiles. The Wall of Death at the former Auschwitz concentration camp – a place for solemnity, not smiles. Nicole Low/AAP Image

Death tourism, Auschwitz selfies, and online souvenirs

Ouch. I think my entire body physically cringed when I came across the latest story of a misjudged tweet gone viral this week: the case of Breanna Mitchell, the naïve teenager and self-styled “Princess…
It is quite clear that Abbott is a western traditionalist when it comes to his interest in the past. It is quite clear that Abbott is a western traditionalist when it comes to his interest in the past. Dean Lewins/ AAP

Tony Abbott’s history

Wherever does our prime minister get his technique for historical analysis? Just before last week’s chaotic carbon tax repeal scenes in Canberra, prime minister Tony Abbott offended the People’s Republic…
The Vandals were buried beneath the awful weight of metaphor. The Vandals were buried beneath the awful weight of metaphor. Dr Case

Vandals took the handles – but what else did they do?

It might seem a stretch to say history has been unkind to the Vandals. After all, this barbarian group did as much as anyone to sound the last rites of the Roman Empire in the west. They captured the rich…
The key, as so often in sport, is timing. The key, as so often in sport, is timing. Joe Castro/AAP Image

Aussie Rules rules thanks to the eight-hour working day

Why is AFL the main sport in Victoria and the other southern States while New South Wales and Queensland follow rugby? That’s long been a vexed question, but we may now be closer to an answer. In Melbourne…
The 1981 coup leaders claimed to be defending the Spanish monarchy, but King Juan Carlos ensured they did not succeed. The 1981 coup leaders claimed to be defending the Spanish monarchy, but King Juan Carlos ensured they did not succeed. Manuel Perez Barriopedro/Wordpress

Of kings and coups: Thailand could learn from Juan Carlos

I clearly remember the BBC news on February 23, 1981. The second item concerned an attempted coup in Spain in which armed soldiers marched into the Cortes (parliament) and took its members hostage. Their…
What links the former Soviet Union to the Russia we know today? What links the former Soviet Union to the Russia we know today? Rob Ketcherside

Back in the USSR: my life as a ‘spy’ in the archives

Spies were a glamour news item in Western (and Soviet) press in the 1960s; it was the age of Kim Philby, British spymaster-cum-Soviet spy, and the endless media hunt for the “fifth man” of the Cambridge…
Peter Foley, The Crimson Field’s hospital orderly. Peter Foley, The Crimson Field’s hospital orderly. BBC/Nick Briggs

Don’t forget the hospital orderlies of World War I, on or off the screen

With the centenary commemorations continuing, all things World War I have been filling our screens, pages and radio waves. The latest of these was the BBC’s The Crimson Field, a drama set in a field hospital…
Heidegger’s Nazi ties and anti-Semitism are indisputable. Can the man be separated from his philosophy? Heidegger’s Nazi ties and anti-Semitism are indisputable. Can the man be separated from his philosophy?

Heidegger’s notebooks reveal an early blindness to the Nazis' reality

Martin Heidegger (1889-1976) is easily the most controversial philosopher in the 20th century. To a large extent this is due to his implication in Nazism, which is a scandal to some, a fascinating spectacle…
There’s more to history than kings and queens. There’s more to history than kings and queens. wallg

School history exams shouldn’t just be a test of Britishness

The government has recently announced changes to the content of GCSE and A level history exams in England. As in previous reforms to the history curriculum, the documents set out the proportion of British…
Personal records of soldiers and their families bring us closer to the effects and experience of war. Personal records of soldiers and their families bring us closer to the effects and experience of war. Australian War Memorial

Soldiers' true war stories will live on in the digital archives

The coming centenary of the first world war has already prompted some disquiet about a revival of the so-called “history wars”, given the significance of war to ideas of Australian national identity. In…
Why has Anzac Day and the concept of ‘Anzac’ experienced such a resurgence in recent years, particularly among young people? Why has Anzac Day and the concept of ‘Anzac’ experienced such a resurgence in recent years, particularly among young people? AAP

Anzac Day: are we in danger of compassion fatigue?

Thousands of young Australians will gather at Gallipoli this Anzac Day. Our TV screens will fill with faces in the cold light of early dawn, a tear trickling down the cheek in sadness that so many died…
Beyond the tea and scones, the Country Women’s Association has played an important role in Australian women’s history. Beyond the tea and scones, the Country Women’s Association has played an important role in Australian women’s history. topsynette

Perhaps tea and scones are OK: the CWA and feminism today

Next month the Country Women’s Association (CWA) of New South Wales will vote whether or not to put one of their most valuable assets, their Potts Point headquarters, up for sale. The prospect of the sale…
A new oral history project is collecting the life stories of several generations of gay and lesbian Australians. A new oral history project is collecting the life stories of several generations of gay and lesbian Australians. Zürich Tourismus

Learning from the lives of gay and lesbian Australians

Australia’s legal system may not yet reflect this but in 2014, according to a range of polls, a majority of Australians support same-sex marriage. Two decades ago, such support would have been beyond the…
Joko Widodo is seen as the most committed to human rights of Indonesia’s potential leaders, but it’s not a big issue in coming legislative and presidential elections. Joko Widodo is seen as the most committed to human rights of Indonesia’s potential leaders, but it’s not a big issue in coming legislative and presidential elections. EPA/Mast Irham

Half a century on, victims' voices haunt a democratic Indonesia

The Indonesian army and civilian vigilantes killed at least half a million people between 1965 and 1968. Hundreds of thousands more were imprisoned without trial for long periods. Some were sent to remote…
Betty Balfour, loving life and laughter. Betty Balfour, loving life and laughter. Courtesy of BFI National Archive.

Discovery of lost silent film raises hopes for more finds

The discovery of 1923 British silent film Love, Life and Laughter, widely hailed as a “lost masterpiece”, is exciting in returning a film celebrated upon its release as a highpoint in British cinema. Fantastic…
The huge caldera of Mount Tambora, Indonesia – still active today. The huge caldera of Mount Tambora, Indonesia – still active today. Jialiang Gao

Largest volcanic eruption in human history changed the 19th century as much as Napoleon

Most have heard of the Battle of Waterloo, but who has heard of the volcano called Tambora? No school textbook I’ve seen mentions that only two months before Napoleon’s final defeat in Belgium on June…
Full speed ahead in search of globalisation. Full speed ahead in search of globalisation.

Data mining uncovers 19th century Britain’s fat habit

A collaboration between historians, text mining, and information visualisation researchers has thrown up new insight into the hunger for sugar, coffee and rubber in the 19th century, as well as how fat…
Now is the winter of our disbelief. Now is the winter of our disbelief. Gareth Fuller/PA

Don’t panic, the car park skeleton is almost certainly Richard III

Controversy over Richard III’s alleged resting place in a lonely Leicester car park has recently erupted after two eminent academics claimed it could not be said with any confidence that the skeleton in…
Swashbuckling stuff. Swashbuckling stuff. BBC/Dusan Martincek

BBC’s Musketeers and the rise of history as entertainment

BBC One’s swaggering epic The Musketeers has concluded with much skulduggery and winning of honour. A second series has already been confirmed after the show opened spectacularly with a consolidated audience…
The publishing of popular history is driven not by how scholars write, but by what readers are willing to buy. The publishing of popular history is driven not by how scholars write, but by what readers are willing to buy. Erik Mauer

What is academic history for?

Writing on Saturday in The Age, popular historian Paul Ham launched a frontal assault on “academic history” produced by university-based historians primarily for consumption by their professional peers…
Though Asia is riddled with flashpoints, alarmists tend to overlook the level of dialogue, such as this meeting in Beijing between the US and Chinese navy chiefs, Ray Mabus and Zhang Jianchang. Though Asia is riddled with flashpoints, alarmists tend to overlook the level of dialogue, such as this meeting in Beijing between the US and Chinese navy chiefs, Ray Mabus and Zhang Jianchang. Official US Navy Imagery/Flickr

It’s not 1914 all over again: Asia is preparing to avoid war

One hundred years ago, Europe stumbled into an unexpected and utterly devastating war. It was unexpected for two reasons: the diplomatic mechanisms set up after Napoleon’s defeat had kept the continent…
What does a 21st century Viking look like? What does a 21st century Viking look like? Anthony Devlin/PA

More than blood and bling: our many visions of the Vikings

The Vikings have arrived at the British Museum. This exhibition, the first of its kind for decades, is notable for its scale and ambition. That there is sufficient demand is unsurprising, given the recent…
Decisions made when the University of Sydney was founded in 1852 laid the historical foundation for a curious relationship between universities and religion in Australia. Decisions made when the University of Sydney was founded in 1852 laid the historical foundation for a curious relationship between universities and religion in Australia. AAP/Paul Miller

Australian universities and religion: tales of horror and hope

Australian universities have had a curious relationship with religion. The nation’s first university excluded clerical teachers of religion, which soon had the unintended consequence of marginalising religious…
The “digger myth” has left little room for appreciation or debate surrounding the work of today’s service personnel. The “digger myth” has left little room for appreciation or debate surrounding the work of today’s service personnel. Australian Department of Defence/AAP Image

The hard sell: has the Anzac industry passed its use-by date?

In his new book Anzac’s Long Shadow: The cost of our national obsession, James Brown argues that: a century after the war to end all wars, Anzac is being bottled, stamped and sold. The former soldier turned…
Jarman in the 60s, seeing things differently. Jarman in the 60s, seeing things differently. Ray Dean/KCL

Time-travelling Derek Jarman is a beacon for the humanities

It is 20 years since the AIDS-related death of Derek Jarman, filmmaker, painter, author, gardener – and a crucial voice in gay politics in Britain. And when you look at his work today, two decades can…
Cupid Complaining To Venus by Lucas Cranach The Elder once belonged to Hitler. Cupid Complaining To Venus by Lucas Cranach The Elder once belonged to Hitler. Ian West/PA

Monuments men are all the rage, but we’re still afraid of Nazi art

“I’m to put a team together and do our best to protect buildings, bridges and art, before the Nazis destroy everything,” George Clooney tells Matt Damon in a dimly lit bar. The Monuments Men is one of…
Tomes of war stories. Tomes of war stories. gfpeck

Glory, farce and despair: the many stories of World War I

Anniversaries encourage reflection. Now, 100 years after the start of the Great War, anyone who follows current affairs or reads a newspaper is part of a cultural conversation, a widespread reassessment…
The pomp and glamour of the Sochi Winter Olympics opening ceremony didn’t quite project an accurate version of Russian history. The pomp and glamour of the Sochi Winter Olympics opening ceremony didn’t quite project an accurate version of Russian history. Flickr/Kristy Yang Photography

Looking through the spectacle, Olympic opening ceremonies can rewrite history

The role of an Olympic opening ceremony is twofold – it is a place to show off to the world and it is a place to converse with your own citizens. So what did the grand opening ceremony to the Sochi Winter…
It’s not easy undertaking archaeological work in Egypt currently – but a major new find illuminates a torrid period in Egyptian history. It’s not easy undertaking archaeological work in Egypt currently – but a major new find illuminates a torrid period in Egyptian history. Neil and Kathy Carey

What the new pharaoh tells us about ancient Egypt

Last month’s discovery in South Abydos, in Egypt – of the remains of the pharaoh, Senekbay, which date to the Second Intermediate Period (c. 1750-1550 BC) – sheds new light on a complex and divided period…
We could be celebrating an anthem with words most other English speakers don’t understand. We could be celebrating an anthem with words most other English speakers don’t understand. Dan Peled/AAP

How Advance Australia Fair waltzed with Matilda and won

Australia Day looms. Across the country, ceremonies large and small will stand for the national anthem. Lots of golden soil, nature’s gifts and girting by sea. The national anthem is ubiquitous now at…
Dutch and French Huguenot refugees were the targets of fear and restrictions in 16th-century England – not unlike those who seek asylum in Australia. Dutch and French Huguenot refugees were the targets of fear and restrictions in 16th-century England – not unlike those who seek asylum in Australia. AAP Image/Jon Faulkner

The asylum seekers who frightened Elizabethan England

Would you be pleased to find a nation of such barbarous temper that, breaking out in hideous violence, would not afford you an abode on earth … What would you think to be thus used? This is the strangers…
Alfred the Great can finally rest in peace. Alfred the Great can finally rest in peace. Neil Howard

Close to the bone: the search for Alfred the Great is nearly over

After months of research, excavating old graves and following one lead after another, my colleagues and I can confirm that remains we discovered are those of English king Alfred the Great or his son Edward…
The country Richard ruled was very different from the one that exists today. The country Richard ruled was very different from the one that exists today. University of Leicester

Consent and discontent: what will become of Richard III’s bones?

Richard III’s skeleton, dug up from a carpark in Leicester in 2012, is currently the subject of a legal dispute about where he should be buried. In one corner is the University of Leicester, whose archaeologists…
Who you think you’re kidding, Mr Gove? Who you think you’re kidding, Mr Gove? PA / Martin Keene

German historians have little time for Gove’s Blackadder jibes

Michael Gove must be off his head. In Germany any politician who tried giving professionals a history lecture would be considered a lunatic. German historians love to argue among themselves, and there…
Politicians such as Cory Bernardi hold strong views on the family – but where does the idea of the natural family unit come from? Politicians such as Cory Bernardi hold strong views on the family – but where does the idea of the natural family unit come from? AAP Image/Alan Porritt

The science of the ‘natural’ family unit

It’s no secret that South Australian senator Cory Bernardi is a fan of what he calls “traditional family structures”. His views are back in the news this week with the release of his latest book, The Conservative…
What does the colour of carrots have to do with the history of The Netherlands? What does the colour of carrots have to do with the history of The Netherlands? niznoz

Explainer: why are carrots orange?

Why are carrots orange? They were bred orange in The Netherlands during the 17th century from the older white and purple stock (that are now back in fashion as “heritage” varieties) to show support for…
Advert for a bus company, Tineghir, southern Morocco Advert for a bus company, Tineghir, southern Morocco Hein de Haas

Explainer: what makes people migrate?

Why do people migrate? At first glance it seems reasonable to assume that most people move hoping to find better conditions or opportunities elsewhere, such as jobs, higher wages, safety or freedom of…
Gravestones at Rookwood range from the majestic to the tacky. Gravestones at Rookwood range from the majestic to the tacky. Crouchy69

Peace at last in Sydney’s Rookwood Cemetery

Sydney’s Rookwood Cemetery, the largest necropolis in the southern hemisphere, has had its share of troubles lately. A recent ABC investigation reported on a suite of alleged governance problems, including…
There are many stories of Australia’s combat involvement that have not yet but should be told. There are many stories of Australia’s combat involvement that have not yet but should be told. AAP

Mentioning the war: why Afghanistan and Australia’s other conflicts must be discussed

Recently, legitimate concerns about the media coverage of Australia’s military involvement in the war in Afghanistan have been raised. It is true that much more that can and should be said about the army’s…
Larkin about: the people of Hull celebrate their city’s victory. Larkin about: the people of Hull celebrate their city’s victory. Anna Gowthorpe/PA

Larkin, Ronson and 26 reasons why Hull is UK City of Culture

Kingston-upon-Hull has been named the UK City of Culture for 2017; a spotlight has been thrown on a place that many people either don’t really know much about, sometimes falling prey to typical Home Counties…
We hear ever more about the value of creativity – but it’s a concept that needs to be historically defined. We hear ever more about the value of creativity – but it’s a concept that needs to be historically defined. barriegreens

Is creativity eternal? No, we made it up ourselves

There are few English nouns that have received such relentlessly good publicity as the word “creativity”. Creativity — apparently — drives innovation, increases productivity, and safeguards the national…
Curiously, there has been no outcry over the Anzac centenary logo. Curiously, there has been no outcry over the Anzac centenary logo. emmettanderson

Brand Anzac™ – a historic past or mythic present?

The logo for the upcoming Anzac centenary was released last year with surprisingly little fanfare. The final design was selected from several options by the Anzac Centenary Advisory Board after consultation…
Remembrance Day is one of many historic Australian events to fall on that date. Remembrance Day is one of many historic Australian events to fall on that date. (AAP Image/Paul Miller

The other Australia Day: November 11 throughout history

Australia’s national story is littered with significant occasions that have fallen on November 11 and two years ago, for me, was no different. It was the morning of November 11, 2011 and I was working…
We should worry less about emissions and more about getting people out of harm’s way. We should worry less about emissions and more about getting people out of harm’s way. AAP Image/Dan Himbrechts

Climate change and bushfires - you’re missing the point!

Climate change has yet again been blamed for another natural disaster, this time the recent bushfires in NSW. But much more important is the role of poor land-use planning decisions that are increasing…
After centuries of war, Japan’s well-attuned environmental practices spurred rapid growth. After centuries of war, Japan’s well-attuned environmental practices spurred rapid growth. mharrsch/Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

Lessons from Edo Japan can help Fukushima recover

After two and a half years, the embattled Japanese government and Tepco, the company responsible for the Fukushima nuclear power plant, have sought the world’s assistance in tackling the three damaged…
A new academic work which covers all of Australia’s history is a timely addition to Australian historical scholarship. A new academic work which covers all of Australia’s history is a timely addition to Australian historical scholarship. Australia image from www.shutterstock.com

Our past revisited: new Cambridge History of Australia gives us the big picture

This week’s launch of the two-volume Cambridge History of Australia comes just as the Coalition government fires the opening salvo of a new battle in the Australian history wars. Over the past 12 months…
Schama’s controlled emotion made for gripping viewing. Schama’s controlled emotion made for gripping viewing. Financial Times photos

Story of the Jews: Schama got it in the neck, but got it right

In nearly 40 years of teaching Jewish Studies at university the course I found hardest to deliver was my first-year “Introduction to Judaism”. It didn’t get any easier: the more I learned, the more I agonised…
Opposition leader Tony Abbott has signalled he’d like to see the history curriculum change. But is it a good idea for government to intervene? Opposition leader Tony Abbott has signalled he’d like to see the history curriculum change. But is it a good idea for government to intervene? AAP Image/AFP Pool, Saeed Khan

Culture wars II: why Abbott should leave the history curriculum alone

In the last week of the campaign, some naggingly familiar comments came out from the Coalition. Then opposition leader Tony Abbott said he wanted to see the national curriculum in history changed because…
Lobbying Bill? They’re having a laugh! Lobbying Bill? They’re having a laugh! PA Wire

Think the Lobbying Bill’s bad? Here are the worst laws ever

Speakers in this week’s Commons debate on the Transparency of Lobbying, non-Party Campaigning, and Trade Union Administration Bill did not pull their punches. The bill was described as “flawed”, “rushed…
The Essendon drugs saga is but the latest in a long history of scandals for Australian rules football. The Essendon drugs saga is but the latest in a long history of scandals for Australian rules football. AAP/Julian Smith

Essendon charged with bringing the game into disrepute: a history of footy scandals

As I write, the front pages of Melbourne’s newspapers this morning scream in chorus: Charged: Bombers Drug Scandal. But is this really the worst “scandal” in footy history? My first lesson in football…
Reform of the ALP has been raised by several key figures such as former leader Mark Latham, and implemented in some form by current prime minister Kevin Rudd. Reform of the ALP has been raised by several key figures such as former leader Mark Latham, and implemented in some form by current prime minister Kevin Rudd. AAP/Alan Porritt

Arguments against party reform: heeding lessons from 1832

In his recent Quarterly Essay, Mark Latham compared Labor parliamentary representation to the rotten boroughs of the 18th century. Though union membership has fallen away, suggested Latham, union officials…
Caricatures of today’s politicians can be found anywhere from rallies to mainstream newspapers. Caricatures of today’s politicians can be found anywhere from rallies to mainstream newspapers. AAP/Miles Godfrey

A true reflection? How caricatures can help or hinder politicians

In the current vicious political climate, caricatures in our daily press have become more savage. Perhaps no politician has experienced this more in recent times than former prime minister Julia Gillard…
Their child shouldn’t be trapped in the role. Their child shouldn’t be trapped in the role. Andrew Matthews/PA Wire

It’s a boy – but baby Cambridge deserves choices in life

Not for the first time in our long lives, Prince Charles and I find ourselves on parallel tracks, our first grandchildren born within weeks of each other. I offer him my congratulations, and hope that…
Sendai, Japan after the 2011 tsunami: imagine nature’s destruction at the push of a button. Sendai, Japan after the 2011 tsunami: imagine nature’s destruction at the push of a button. US Navy

The strange military origins of environmentalism

The words “environmentalism” and “military” are not typically found in the same sentence. Yet ideas about our vulnerability to environmental change are directly linked to military plans for a third world…
Second tier universities should embrace the new university trajectory and avoid mimicking the traditions set by institutions such as Oxford. Second tier universities should embrace the new university trajectory and avoid mimicking the traditions set by institutions such as Oxford. Shutterstock

Why our ‘second tier’ universities are responsible for social and economic change

The modern Western university has five major historical trajectories, four of which were dominant for more than 400 years. But the fifth, while spanning no more than 50 years, has been a crucial driver…
Smash the system, not traffic lights. Smash the system, not traffic lights. flikr/bobaliciouslondon

Why aren’t unemployed young people rioting in the streets?

A fifth of Britain’s young people are out of work; how long before they snap? The International Labour Organisation has recently issued warnings about possible youth unrest in the future, as young people…
Whacking your funny bone really hard will cause a mild nerve injury which may take minutes, hours or even days to come good. Whacking your funny bone really hard will cause a mild nerve injury which may take minutes, hours or even days to come good. Image from shutterstock.com

Explainer: what is the funny bone?

Put a finger on the point of your elbow. Feel inwards from there about half and inch or slightly more until you find another bony outcrop. Got it? Good. Tap with your finger in the valley between those…
The Courier Mail never retracted a story alleging Manning Clark was a spy, even though the Press Council ruled against them. The Courier Mail never retracted a story alleging Manning Clark was a spy, even though the Press Council ruled against them. AAP/Dave Hunt

Media reform could save victims of misinformation … like my grandfather

It is a matter of public record in Australia that my grandfather was a communist spy. That he wasn’t really one doesn’t always matter. Manning Clark, famous Australian historian and my father’s father…
The bones of Richard III, whose remains were found more than 500 years after his death at the Battle of Bosworth Field. The bones of Richard III, whose remains were found more than 500 years after his death at the Battle of Bosworth Field. AAP/University of Leicester

Bones of contention: why Richard III’s skeleton won’t change history

“It will be a whole new era for Richard III,” Lynda Pidgeon, spokeswoman for the Richard III Society, said of the discovery that the skeleton found under a car-park in Leicester is almost certainly that…
Are displays of emotion from sportspeople about convincing us that it’s not just about the money? Are displays of emotion from sportspeople about convincing us that it’s not just about the money? fox2mike/flickr

It’ll end in tears: why athletes cry and what it means

Any major sporting triumph without euphoric emotion or a serious opening of the floodgates would seem strange. Commentators tell us that tears show “passion”. Fans seem to demand them. It wasn’t always…
NSW premier Barry O'Farrell needs to reform the law to give Sydney University more responsibility for its colleges. NSW premier Barry O'Farrell needs to reform the law to give Sydney University more responsibility for its colleges. AAP Image/Alan Porritt

Why a solution to the St John’s scandal lies with Barry O’Farrell

Why is the University of Sydney powerless to stop bullying behaviour in what the public sees as “its colleges”? This has been a constant refrain in recent weeks as the controversy surrounding the behaviour…
Spermatorrhoea was said to be ‘the most dire, excruciating and deadly maladies to which the human frame is subject.’ Spermatorrhoea was said to be ‘the most dire, excruciating and deadly maladies to which the human frame is subject.’ Guillaume Duchenne

Spermatorrhoea, the lesser known male version of hysteria

MEDICAL HISTORIES - The second instalment in our short series examines how the spermatorrhoea epidemic changed the scope of medicine. Every period arguably invents its own illnesses, medical disorders…
There are some powerful stories in the Anzac tradition but many more that are unknown to students. There are some powerful stories in the Anzac tradition but many more that are unknown to students. Australian War Memorial

Teaching the untold stories of World War I

“What are your legs? Springs. Steel springs”. Archy’s nervous mutterings before he sprints into gunfire are familiar in Australian history classes. So are the tale of Simpson and Duffy and their “bravest…
Australia is not fulfilling its obligations to its veterans. Australia is not fulfilling its obligations to its veterans. Flickr/Another Seb

Roll call: how Australia broke the promise of remembrance

Ten years ago this month, John Howard’s Minister for Veteran Affairs, Danna Vale, launched a searchable internet database known as the World War 2 Nominal Roll. It was intended to be a virtual war memorial…
Why is it that we no longer teach the big story of how everything came to be? Why is it that we no longer teach the big story of how everything came to be? Universe image from www.shutterstock.com

Big History: why we need to teach the modern origin story

All human societies construct and teach creation myths or origin stories. These are large, extraordinarily powerful, but often ramshackle narratives that try and tell the story of how everything came to…
1783: Maria Anna Mayrin murders a three-year-old girl, turns herself in and is sentenced to death. 1783: Maria Anna Mayrin murders a three-year-old girl, turns herself in and is sentenced to death. Stadt- und Staatsbibliothek Augsburg, Graphic, Verbrecher etc.

A hell of an incentive for murder: a rationalist’s guide to suicide

The Holy Roman Empire, 1704: Agnes Catherina Schickin slits the throat of a seven-year-old boy. 1746: Johanna Martauschin smashes the skull of a small child. 1753: Sophia Charlotte Krügerin cuts the throat…
Australian humanities subjects need to get on board with MOOCs and develop Australian voices in online learning. Australian humanities subjects need to get on board with MOOCs and develop Australian voices in online learning. World image from www.shutterstock.com

Deadset? MOOCs and Australian education in a globalised world

FUTURE OF HIGHER EDUCATION: We continue our series on the rise of online and blended learning and how free online courses are set to transform the higher education sector. Today Ruth Morgan looks at the…
Former Prime Minister John Howard is misinformed about the Australian history curriculum. Former Prime Minister John Howard is misinformed about the Australian history curriculum. AAP Image/Julian Smith

Howard’s history repeating: curriculum complaints nothing new

There is a great deal of derogatory, evidence-free and ill-informed opinion about how history is taught in Australian schools. But these tired arguments are so often repeated that we can actually put them…
Will we ultimately see 2012 as triumphant, or as just one step in an emerging global tragedy? Will we ultimately see 2012 as triumphant, or as just one step in an emerging global tragedy? Jenny Varley

Opening the fabled Northwest Passage: triumph or tragedy?

A combination of 33-year satellite records, measurements made over the past century, and long-term proxy analysis suggests Arctic sea ice may be at its lowest level for more than 1,000 years. According…
Statuettes and a reproduction of the automatic theatre of Hero of Alexandria. Statuettes and a reproduction of the automatic theatre of Hero of Alexandria. Alan Dorin.

We are the creators of artificial life – both now and through the ages

As humans, we create life. And we’re all familiar with the idea of artificial intelligence. But what about artificial life? What is it, and why should we care? Artificial Life is a recently labelled but…
The Crusader fortress of Krak De Chevalier has been damaged by shelling after rebels used it as a defensive position. The Crusader fortress of Krak De Chevalier has been damaged by shelling after rebels used it as a defensive position. AAP image

The perils of history and antiquity in Syria

The looting of the Baghdad Museum in 2003 during the invasion of Iraq is an example the consequences of war on national heritage. Almost a decade on, the civil war in Syria has seen history repeating itself…
The final pieces of the historical puzzle around the 1975 Whitlam dismissal are not as sensational as they first seem. The final pieces of the historical puzzle around the 1975 Whitlam dismissal are not as sensational as they first seem. Image courtesy of National Archives of Australia. NAA: A6180, 13/11/75/33

Mason’s role in the 1975 dismissal ‘unprecedented’? Hardly …

Much hyperbole has been generated by the recent revelations concerning Sir Anthony Mason’s involvement in the 1975 dismissal, but for the most part it shows ignorance of the past. Earlier this week, The…
By deliberately making false historical sources, students can learn to think more critically. By deliberately making false historical sources, students can learn to think more critically. Historical hoax image www.shutterstock.com

Teaching students to lie: historical method through hoaxes

What happens when you teach students how to lie? Answer: they become better historians. More than a decade ago, back in the days of Web 0.5, a student of mine submitted a generally well-written essay on…
Revolution and war: is it all just a little bit of history repeating? Revolution and war: is it all just a little bit of history repeating? blprnt_van

Cliodynamics: can science decode the laws of history?

They say history always repeats itself - empires rise and fall, economies boom and bust - but is there a way to map and predict the dynamical processes of history? The new and highly controversial discipline…
President Nixon’s meeting with China’s Communist Party Leader Mao Tse Tung in 1972 began closer ties between the two countries. President Nixon’s meeting with China’s Communist Party Leader Mao Tse Tung in 1972 began closer ties between the two countries. Wikimedia/Office of Presidential Libraries

Stabilising the Middle East: lessons from the US rapprochement with China

Now, as at the time of the Vietnam war, the global primacy of the United States is increasingly being questioned. Among the reasons are its role in the Global Financial Crisis (GFC), the continued and…
Vietnam-US relations, as represented here by US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vietnam’s Foreign Minister Pham Binh Minh, have come a long way. Vietnam-US relations, as represented here by US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vietnam’s Foreign Minister Pham Binh Minh, have come a long way. EPA/KHAM/POOL

Forgetting the ‘American War’: Vietnam’s friendship with its former enemy

Today marks the 50th anniversary of Australian forces arriving in Vietnam – the beginning of a war that had a huge impact on social and political life here in Australia and abroad. The Conversation will…
Opposition education spokesman Christopher Pyne’s recent comments show his misunderstanding of curriculum. Opposition education spokesman Christopher Pyne’s recent comments show his misunderstanding of curriculum. AAP Image/Alan Porritt

A history of misinformation: Pyne spreads curriculum myths

On the ABC’s Q&A program on Monday night, Shadow Minister for Education Christopher Pyne was asked what the Liberal Party would do about the national (history) curriculum if they came to power. Pyne’s…
If the same parts of Australian history are taught over and over again, we shouldn’t be surprised that students lose interest. If the same parts of Australian history are taught over and over again, we shouldn’t be surprised that students lose interest. Flickr/murphyeppoon

Beat-ups aside, Australian history has a future

Buried away in the correspondence columns of last week’s Sunday Age, a former history teacher’s letter “Where’s our history?” started an intense and confused debate about a “threat” by the national curriculum…
Media commentators have been eager to paint Neandertals as artists – but why? Media commentators have been eager to paint Neandertals as artists – but why? Federico Gambarini/AAP

The art of loving Neandertals – they’re like us, but different

An article published recently in Science sheds new light on paintings found in 11 cave sites in Spain. At 40,800 years old, some of these paintings could be among the oldest anywhere in the world. But…
On her recent visit to Thailand, Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi said her country had an urgent need for basic education. On her recent visit to Thailand, Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi said her country had an urgent need for basic education. EPA/Barbara Walton

How education can help Burma on the fragile road to democracy

On June 1, after decades of struggle to be a legitimate voice for the Burmese people, Aung San Suu Kyi addressed the World Economic Forum on East Asia in Bangkok. She did not raise a call to arms or popular…
Guillaume Le Gentil sailed the seas for many years to catch a glimpse of Venus in transit. Guillaume Le Gentil sailed the seas for many years to catch a glimpse of Venus in transit. Brocken Inaglory

Transit of Venus: a tale of two expeditions

On Wednesday, as you’ll no doubt know by now, a rare celestial event will occur. Venus will pass between the earth and the sun - the transit of Venus. You might also already know that this cosmic spectacle…
Don’t look at the transit of Venus directly … but make sure you look at it. Don’t look at the transit of Venus directly … but make sure you look at it. Jan Herold

Transit of Venus: a must-see for everyone … no seriously

When Australia II won the America’s Cup yacht race in 1983, then-prime-minister Bob Hawke famously exclaimed: “Any boss who sacks anyone for not turning up today is a bum.” Taking inspiration from this…
A vitamin C a day won’t keep colds away. A vitamin C a day won’t keep colds away. Owaief

Monday’s medical myth: vitamin C prevents colds

Vitamin C is so often suggested as a treatment for the common cold that it’s almost considered common sense. This well-known vitamin is primarily found in fruits and vegetables, with small quantities in…
Religious groups claim “ex-gay” therapies have scientific merit. Religious groups claim “ex-gay” therapies have scientific merit. flickr/michael keith photography

Praying the gay away: when religion hijacks science

It’s been decades since electroshock therapy or other psychiatric interventions were routinely employed to “treat” homosexuality. These days, reparative therapy is more popular. It involves a combination…
Modern professionals have an opportunity to undo some of the hardships created by pathologizing same-sex attraction. Modern professionals have an opportunity to undo some of the hardships created by pathologizing same-sex attraction. stigeredoo

From homophobia to homophilia: the future face of medicine

Homophilia, a term once used to define “unnatural” relations between same-sex people in the early- to mid-20th century has been given a makeover. Urban gay communities around the world are using homophilia…
Analysing Anzac speech, slang and reading material gives us a better understanding of their experience. Analysing Anzac speech, slang and reading material gives us a better understanding of their experience. EPA/Tolga Bozoglu

From ‘Aussies’ to ‘Whizz-bangs’: the language of Anzac

Many place the Anzac legend at the heart of the Australian national identity. But some have rightly challenged this idea, opening up debate about why the Anzac story is so central to our national mythology…
Information is everywhere all at once these days, which raises questions around how it should be archived. Information is everywhere all at once these days, which raises questions around how it should be archived. petit hiboux

Masters of the digital multiverse: can public libraries save the day?

We all know the internet has enabled the creation of digital worlds of multi-layered, interconnected online information. But who’s going to protect this information for current and future generations…
Australia has a long history of engagement with Asia, as Melbourne’s Chinese Museum demonstrates. Australia has a long history of engagement with Asia, as Melbourne’s Chinese Museum demonstrates. Greenstone Girl

Engaging with Asia? We’ve been here before

AUSTRALIA IN THE ASIAN CENTURY – A series examining Australia’s role in the rapidly transforming Asian region. Delivered in partnership with the Australian government. Today, Professor David Walker looks…
Medical schools once battled with a shortage of cadavers, which led to some unsavoury practices. Medical schools once battled with a shortage of cadavers, which led to some unsavoury practices. Derek Harper

Donating your body to science? Don’t worry, it’s not what it used to be

The recent discovery of hundreds of human body parts in the University of Cologne’s cellars shocked Germany’s academic community and raised broader questions about the rights of people who donate their…
Drugs smuggled into a South Australian prison. If jails can’t be kept drug free, what hope is there for wider society? Drugs smuggled into a South Australian prison. If jails can’t be kept drug free, what hope is there for wider society? AAP/Thuy On

Australia’s love affair with drugs

Australians have always loved their drugs – more so than any other nation in which those same drugs are proscribed and used under threat of native, criminal penalties. Drug taking is a national trait…
Local history has an important place in Australia. The academic world should get involved. Local history has an important place in Australia. The academic world should get involved. Flickr/Kate's Photo Diary

Academic snobbery: local historians need more support

Local history is one of the most popular forms of history in Australia. Yet there is a yawning gap between the enthusiastic amateur and the academic historian. While some academic historians engage with…
Greater Western Sydney may be a new team, but Sydney and AFL have firm historical ties. Greater Western Sydney may be a new team, but Sydney and AFL have firm historical ties. AAP Image/Paul Miller

With the debut of GWS, Aussie Rules comes home to Sydney

The AFL season kicks off today and there’s a new team in town – Greater Western Sydney. Some don’t like it – the cynics claim Aussie Rules has no historical foothold in western Sydney. I disagree. While…
The victims of forced adoption want an apology from the Commonwealth government. The victims of forced adoption want an apology from the Commonwealth government. Nikkirk

Re-writing Australia’s history of forced adoption

A long-awaited Senate Committee report will tomorrow reveal whether the Commonwealth’s policies and practices played a role in coercing young, unwed Australian women to give up their newborn babies for…
International Holocaust day is an important day to remember all atrocities in human history. International Holocaust day is an important day to remember all atrocities in human history. EPA/Jacek Bednarczyk

Remembrance is the most powerful weapon against genocide

It’s hard to imagine that a whole race of people can be forgotten. But if no one chooses to remember them, genocide can mean just that, leaving a large hole in our history and dooming future minorities…
Pardoning Breaker Morant should not be a priority for the government. Pardoning Breaker Morant should not be a priority for the government. AAP Image/Australian War Memorial

Pardon me, but Breaker Morant was guilty

Early in the New Year, while most of us were thinking about going to the beach or when it would be okay to consign those unwanted Christmas presents to a charity bin, Commander Jim Unkles of the Royal…
You may want to start hoarding supplies and making your end of world plans now – before it’s too late. You may want to start hoarding supplies and making your end of world plans now – before it’s too late. Flickr/Necromundo

2012 cometh: how to prepare for the apocalypse

If you believe the doomsayers, the human race is not long for this earth. By the end of this year, our number will be up: the four horseman of the apocalypse will be upon us, fire will rain from the skies…
Momentum is gathering behind calls to pardon the father of computer science. Momentum is gathering behind calls to pardon the father of computer science. BinaryApe

Calls for a posthumous pardon … but who was Alan Turing?

You may have read the British Government is being petitioned to grant a posthumous pardon to one of the world’s greatest mathematicians and most successful codebreakers, Alan Turing. You may also have…
Many Aboriginal people, like boxer Anthony Mundine, look to Islam as a way of re-connecting with their roots. Many Aboriginal people, like boxer Anthony Mundine, look to Islam as a way of re-connecting with their roots. AAP Image/Tracey Nearmy

Long history with Islam gives Indigenous Australians pride

Muslim conversion is growing in Indigenous communities. In the 2001 national census, 641 Indigenous people identified as Muslim. By the 2006 census the number had climbed by more than 60% to 1014 people…
Cold Chisel are back. Cold Chisel are back. AAP Image/Jones PR

The Last Stand: Cold Chisel and Oz Rock music

It’s December 15th, 1983. Around 13,000 people, a capacity crowd, are packed into the Sydney Entertainment Centre. This is the last of five Cold Chisel shows there. Fans had queued for blocks, some had…
Indigenous Australians systematically burnt grasslands to reduce fuel and stop fires raging out of control. Indigenous Australians systematically burnt grasslands to reduce fuel and stop fires raging out of control. Flickr/pietroizzo

The biggest estate on earth: how Aborigines made Australia

Aboriginal people worked hard to make plants and animals abundant, convenient and predictable. By distributing plants and associating them in mosaics, then using these to lure and locate animals, Aborigines…
Italian-Australians deserve an apology for their mistreatment in internment camps in World War II. Italian-Australians deserve an apology for their mistreatment in internment camps in World War II. Australian War Memorial Collection

Why Australia must apologise to Italians interned during World War II

Last month, the South Australian parliament unanimously accepted a bi-partisan motion moved by Labor member, Tony Piccolo, to acknowledge the wrongful internment of Italian civilians living in Australia…
Mussolini made the trains run on time. But having a strong leader is risky. Mussolini made the trains run on time. But having a strong leader is risky. Flickr/Galaxy FM

Forget politicians - be a dictator for a day and get the job done

“If I Ruled The World” was a tune made famous decades ago by English comedian and singer Harry Secombe who sang of making every day the first day of spring as well as other miraculous improvements. It…
‘Generation’ is a slippery concept. More research is needed to tell real people’s stories. ‘Generation’ is a slippery concept. More research is needed to tell real people’s stories. Flickr/Mickey van der Stap

‘Talkin’ ‘bout Your Generation’: Oral history tells the story of ages

Generational difference is one of the major issues of our time. Game shows like Talkin’‘bout Your Generation assume that Baby Boomers, Gen X and Gen Y contestants have very different attitudes and knowledge…
We are still learning about the Mongolian invasions, 750 years after they happened. We are still learning about the Mongolian invasions, 750 years after they happened. Hanoi History Museum, James Delgado

The original kamikaze: Kublai Khan’s invasion shipwreck found?

Archaeologists from the University of the Ryukyus in Japan have discovered part of a 13th century ship that apparently belonged to Mongolian warlord Kublai Khan. The ship is believed to be a remnant of…
Who will take over the family firm after Prince William is under discussion by Commonwealth leaders. Who will take over the family firm after Prince William is under discussion by Commonwealth leaders. AAP/Lyndon Mechielsen

A long line of discrimination but should succession to the throne be changed?

UPDATE: Commonwealth leaders have now agreed that laws will be changed to allow sons and daughters of any future British monarch to have equal right to the throne. The ban on the head of state marrying…
It’s wrong to assume that China makes no effort to reform its political system because its culture does not support such change. It’s wrong to assume that China makes no effort to reform its political system because its culture does not support such change. Flickr/Katherina

The seeds of democratic culture in China

The skepticism of contemporary China’s multilayered and painful efforts to achieve legal and political reform makes many wonder if democracy can really grow in the Chinese soil. This is such a haunting…
The velocipede created one of several cycling booms in Australia. The velocipede created one of several cycling booms in Australia. Harpers Weekly (Dec 18, 1868)

Bigger than Cadel: Australia’s century-old love affair with cycling

CYCLING IN AUSTRALIA: Forget about the wild scenes of public adulation for Cadel Evans following his Tour de France triumph. Forget about the widespread admiration for champion cyclist Anna Meares following…
Francis Galton pioneered the concept of eugenics in this lab in London in the late 19th century. Francis Galton pioneered the concept of eugenics in this lab in London in the late 19th century. Flickr/Science Museum London

Eugenics in Australia: The secret of Melbourne’s elite

Eugenics — the science of improving the race —was a powerful influence on the development of Western civilisation in the first half of the twentieth century. And Melbourne’s elite were among its chief…
Do we take the sophistication of numbers one to ten for granted? Do we take the sophistication of numbers one to ten for granted? duncan

Magic numbers: the beauty of decimal notation

While adding up your grocery bill in the supermarket, you’re probably not thinking how important or sophisticated our number system is. But the discovery of the present system, by unknown mathematicians…
Australian veterans of the Pacific theatre in WWII attend a VJ Day memorial. Australian veterans of the Pacific theatre in WWII attend a VJ Day memorial. AAP

The war in the Pacific: fighting the good fight, or something else

Sometimes an historian will challenge one of the key ideological myths of Australian capitalism. Henry Reynolds does it in his work on the colonial treatment of Aborigines, a treatment some go so far as…
Refugees fled the Crusades. This is a detail from St Dominic and the Albigenses by Pedro Berruguete. Refugees fled the Crusades. This is a detail from St Dominic and the Albigenses by Pedro Berruguete. Flickr/derechoaleer

Why lessons from the past can help us understand the refugee debate

Given the often hysterical media coverage of the refugee debate you could be forgiven for thinking that people seeking refuge in other countries is a new phenomenon. Not so. Refugees have been around since…
Thousands of Brits moved to Australia for the thrill of a more glamorous life. But many struggled. Thousands of Brits moved to Australia for the thrill of a more glamorous life. But many struggled. Flickr/MarkFaviellPhotos

A moving history: how personal stories illuminate the past

Published biographies, and indeed many histories, are often about the famous, rich or powerful. And most often, they’re about men. I’ve preferred to research and write about so-called “ordinary” men and…
Did music precede language for Homo sapiens? Did music precede language for Homo sapiens? Spuz/Flickr

Evolution: please don’t stop the music

All human cultures and social groups that we know of respond to music and dance. The type of music may vary but the underlying, fundamental principles of making music are the same. Our recognition of…

Research and News (3)

Expert reactions to Gaddafi’s killing

Muammar Gaddafi’s 42-year-rule of Libya has come to an violent end in a manner reminiscent of the dispatch of Fascist Italy’s…

Expert views of Occupy Wall Street

The Occupy Wall Street protests that started in New York have proved contagious. Sit-ins and attempted occupations have spread…

Research Briefs (6)