Articles on ISIS

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The 1,200 year old Umayyad Mosque – also known as the Great Mosque of Aleppo – lost its minaret (on left) in 2013 after continued heavy gunfire between rebels and Syrian government forces. Reuters

Friday essay: war crimes and the many threats to cultural heritage

It is important to prosecute militants who destroy antiquities. But 'everyday' development - from dams flooding towns to the impact of mining on Indigenous rock art – does vastly more damage to heritage than war.
ISIS fighters celebrating in Mosul, Iraq, in 2014. Criminological studies suggest terrorists would use diverse tactics to neutralise feelings of guilt. Reuters

How ISIS terrorists neutralise guilt to justify their atrocities

Do ISIS fighters feel guilty about the violence they perpetrate? Not likely, according to criminological research, which suggests terrorists "neutralise" their guilt, just as many other criminals do.
A girl stands near fighters in Aleppo. August 7, 2016. REUTERS/Rodi Said

Putin, Obama and the battle for Aleppo

The survival of civilians seem forgotten in a new U.S. and Russian agreement to root out IS and other terrorists in Syria.
In the future, will Turkey be a little, or a lot, democratic? Ammar Awad/Reuters

The tragedy of Turkish democracy in five acts

A professor at Ohio State surveyed Turkish citizens about their views on democracy. What he learned helps explain the current crisis in the EU wannabe.
Imam Syed Shafeeq Rahman of the Islamic Center of Fort Pierce speaks with the media following a prayer for victims of the Orlando shooting. Joe Skipper/Reuters

Why bad news for one Muslim American is bad news for all Muslims

Because Muslim Americans are an extreme 'outgroup,' they're all the more vulnerable to discrimination, especially in the wake of negative media coverage.
Antiquities seized in a raid on Islamic State fighters in Syria were returned to the Iraqi government by the United States. Thaier Al-Sudani/Reuters

Inside ISIS’ looted antiquities trade

Profit estimates have ranged from $4 million to $7 billion. But with the Paris attacks costing only $10,000, does a number even matter?
Remembering ISIS victims at the U.N., November 2015. Lucas Jackson/Reuters

ISIS has changed international law

The urgent need to respond to ISIS has redefined the use of "self-defense" to include attacking a nonstate threat in another country. But what are the implications of this? change?

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