Articles on Iraq

Displaying 1 - 20 of 321 articles

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. KCNA/via Reuters

What makes Kim Jong Un tick?

A scholar who has profiled leaders like Saddam Hussein and Vladimir Putin says there is a method to understanding the madness.
An American soldier on a training exercise with a soldier from the Armed Forces of Bosnia and Herzegovina. U.S. Army Europe

How the war in Iraq unintentionally helped stabilise Bosnia

The revelation that a Bosnian company had broken the arms embargo on Iraq unified three armies which had been fighting each other a decade before.
Members of the Iraqi police forces sit outside a building in the city of Fallujah on June 30, 2016 after they’ve recaptured the city from Islamic State (IS) group jihadists. Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP

How Saddam Hussein’s old ideology may have contributed to the modern Islamic State

Was the early conception of IS a branching-out of the old Baath party? Or was it, as some argue, completely separate with no connection at all? Reality is probably a bit of a mix of both.
Many of the Iranian dead in the Nov. 12 Iran earthquake lived in the Mehr Housing, state-built affordable apartments that crumbled when other buildings stayed up. AP Photo/Vahid Salemi

Kurdistan earthquake: politics creates roadblocks to relief

On Nov. 12, a 7.3 magnitude quake killed some 500 and injured 7,000 along the Iran-Iraq border. This Kurdish area has also been crushed by war and, after a recent separatist vote, militarily attacked.
RAAF warplanes fly over Syria in Australia’s first airstrikes in that country in September 2015. AAP/ADF

War and democracy – who decides?

The wars in Syria and Iraq are products of secretive decision-making by the executive. Their disastrous consequences are evidence of the need for war powers reform.
A 1932 photograph showing the minaret of the Great Mosque of al-Nuri, Mosul. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

On Yom Kippur, remembering Mosul’s rich and diverse past

As Mosul rebuilds, its history is a reminder that people of many faiths lived in cooperation in the city. In the city was the Tomb of Prophet Jonah, venerated by Jews, Christians and Muslims alike.
Gebhard Fugel, ‘An den Wassern Babylons.’ Gebhard Fugel [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Why a 2,500-year-old Hebrew poem still matters

Psalm 137 – best known for its opening line, 'By the Rivers of Babylon' – is a 2,500-year-old Hebrew psalm that deals with the Jewish exile -remembered each year on Tisha B'av.

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