Articles on Peer Review

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More is less in the world of research publications. Desktop image via www.shutterstock.com.

Peer review is in crisis, but should be fixed, not abolished

The traditional mode of publishing scientific research faces much criticism – primarily for being too slow and sometimes shoddily done. Maybe fewer publications of higher quality is the way forward.
What are the implications of peer review on competition in science? PROChristian Guthier

Here’s how competition makes peer review more unfair

Peer review is a crucial part of the academic publication system. It is also a critical part of the hiring and evaluation process. What's the problem with peer review?
Eskymaks/Shutterstock

Can the menopause really be reversed?

Researchers at a fertility clinic in Athens appear to have reversed the menopause in a small group of women – but will the science stand up to scrutiny?
Professor Peter Higgs, joint winner of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics. Russell Cheyne/Reuters

Pressure to publish is choking the academic profession

The unavoidable regime of publication pervades contemporary academic life across the world. While presented as a virtuous thing, it can actually suffocate the academic profession.
Every academic journal article is rigorously screened by other experts in the field. Shutterstock

Explainer: the ins and outs of peer review

Peer review is not infallible, but it's central to how science works. In this extract from Peter Doherty's new book, The Knowledge Wars, he explains how it works in practice.
Open access allows users to download, copy, print and distribute works, without the need to ask for permission or to pay. Meredith Kahn/Flickr

Your Questions Answered on open access

To the mark the eighth annual Open Access Week, we asked our readers what they wanted to know about the initiative. Here are their questions with answers from our experts.
The call for a male author on a paper was met with outrage from within the scientific community and the general public. Keoni Cabral/Flickr

Sexism in science: one step back, two steps forward

Sexism still exists in science, but a recent scandal shows that progress is being made.
New data reveals no evidence of gravitational waves in the early universe, as observed by the BICEP2 radio telescope (pictured) near the South Pole. teffen Richter, Harvard University

Gravitational wave discovery still clouded by galactic dust

One of this century’s greatest potential discoveries concerning the origins of the universe has now fallen to galactic dust. That’s according to a new joint-analysis of all the existing data – including…
Do all authors listed on any published work actually contribute to the research? Shutterstock/alexskopje

Tackling unethical authorship deals on scientific publications

The research excellence of academics is often measured by the quantity and quality of their scholarly publications. But how do we know that all authors listed on a publication have actually been involved…

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