Articles on SARS

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President Donald Trump displays a presidential memorandum he signed, declaring the opioid crisis a public health emergency in the East Room of the White House, Oct. 26, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Why Canada should declare a national opioid emergency too

Opioids kill an average of eight people every day in Canada. The federal government must officially declare this a 'public welfare emergency' and invest the funds critical to a humane response.
An infection prevention and control professional wipes her gloves with a bleach wipe during an ebola virus training in Ottawa. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang)

Explainer: How we all benefit from the public health system

Infectious diseases pose a continual threat to Canadians. Ensuring the population stays healthy requires increasing investment in our public health system.
South African protesters hold placards as they march against corruption. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

Lessons from KPMG: be on guard, South Africans are on your case

The South African arm of the international accounting firm KPMG has learnt the hard lesson: Don't break the 11th commandment - don’t get caught. That's because South Africa's citizens are fed up with corruption.
A virus like SARS can shut down cytokine production, enabling it to multiply to higher levels and causing significant infection and even death. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kevin Frayer)

Explainer: How the human body first fights off pathogens

We've all endured infections. Here's how it works when our bodies are attacked by viruses, bacteria or parasites, and our innate immune system becomes the first line of defence.
When a man was diagnosed with Ebola in Dallas in 2014, workers cleared out the apartment unit where he had been staying. Reuters/Jim Young

How Trump’s global health budget endangers Americans

President Trump wants to slash global health funding at a time when more investment is needed, not less. This spending can protect Americans – as well as foreigners – from deadly diseases.
South Africa’s President Jacob Zuma is part of a faction which embraces patronage politics. Reuters/Mike Hutchings

Economic exclusion feeds the politics of patronage in South Africa

It is common to reduce the politics of the ANC to a battle between personalities. A closer look suggest that this is a fight between two factions, both of them products of trends in the economy.
As part of pandemic preparation, in the early 2000s many countries amassed large stockpiles of the influenza neuraminidase inhibitor Tamiflu. Tony Hisgett/Flickr

Controversies in medicine: the rise and fall of the challenge to Tamiflu

One of the biggest recent controversies in medicine involves the effectiveness of the antiviral drug Tamiflu. Governments have stockpiled the drug but many have raised doubts about its usefulness.
Children in particular experience a multitude of viral illnesses during their early years. MIKI Yoshihito/Flickr

Health Check: when are we most likely to catch viral diseases?

Viruses cause all kinds of infections from relatively mild cases of the flu to deadly outbreaks of Ebola. Clearly, not all viruses are equal and one of these differences is when you can infect others.
Avoiding contact with people who have respiratory infections – and are coughing or sneezing – is the key to protection. Jina K/Shutterstock

Explainer: what is the MERS outbreak in South Korea?

Twelve years ago the world was threatened by an outbreak of a new coronavirus called SARS. MERS belongs to the same virus family and has killed 19 people in South Korea.

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