Articles on Asthma

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Several studies have shown that spending time in nature is good for health. Now new research has looked specifically at asthma and found that living in green neighbourhoods protects children from developing the condition. from www.shutterstock.com

Children living in green neighbourhoods are less likely to develop asthma

New research shows that children who live in greener neighbourhoods are less likely to develop asthma, and that the more diverse the plant life is, the more they are protected.
Medical panels are constantly lowering thresholds across many diseases, which results in more and more healthy people being diagnosed as sick. José Martín/Unsplash

How to rein in the widening disease definitions that label more healthy people as sick

More of us are labelled as sick with the constantly changing diagnostic cut-offs for diseases. Now an international expert panel has drafted a list of things to consider before setting new thresholds.
Shifting your diet away from processed foods and towards fruits and vegetables can reduce symptoms of asthma. from www.shutterstock.com

Food as medicine: how what you eat shapes the health of your lungs

Upping your intake of vegetables and fruits can do more than just reduce your risk of heart disease, diabetes and cancer – it could also help you breathe easier.
After the storm … Researchers are working together to predict future outbreaks of thunderstorm asthma. from www.shutterstock.com

Keeping one step ahead of pollen triggers for thunderstorm asthma

Researchers from a range of disciplines need to work together if we are to predict and prepare for the next thunderstorm asthma event.
Climate change can cause higher pollen counts. Lukasz Szmigiel/Unsplash

Can we blame climate change for thunderstorm asthma?

Irrespective of whether climate change contributed to the thunderstorm in Melbourne last week, we can be sure Australia’s climate projections herald new risks to health that cannot be ignored.
Baker’s asthma is an occupational asthma that bakery employees develop after being exposed to cereal grains such as wheat, rye and yeast. Shutterstock

How bakers can get itchy eyes and asthma if flour dust is not contained

Bakery employees develop asthma when they are exposed to high levels of flour dust. Although there are international guidelines these are often not protective and badly implemented.

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