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Dire predictions on the future of children’s brains are shocking, not least because of how flimsy the evidence is to support these views.

Don’t panic, the internet won’t rot children’s brains

Baseless claims about the damage done to kids' development create needless panic. And they distract from legitimate, evidence-based concerns with which parents need to engage.
Research found children with autism understand social cues when prompted, but they usually choose not to interact. from

Children with autism shouldn’t be forced to socialise

People with autism spectrum disorder don't get the same benefits from socialising with other people. So why force them to with methods that aren't true to life anyway?
Vasopressin may be used to treat social deficits in children with autism. kids with ball, from

Autistic kids low on vital social hormone, study suggests

Increasing autistic children's levels of vasopressin, a hormone that regulates social behaviour, could help treat the social deficits common to autism, research suggests.
Epigenetic molecules play a different melody on different people’s genomes, and this might be contributing to some developing autism. Jesse Kruger/Flickr

Music of the genome hits a discord with autism

The epigenetic 'musicians' that play our genomes in different ways might help us understand the causes of autism.
Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder need targeted support and funding to suit their individual needs and interests. from

Students with autism need targeted attention – not a cage

A review has been announced into school policies in Canberra after it was reported that a school was restraining a child with Autism in a cage-like structure.
A newborn baby undergoes music therapy at a hospital in Slovakia. The hospital uses music therapy to treat infants who have been separated from their mothers. Petr Josek Snr/Reuters

Healthy songs: the amazing power of music therapy

From serving newborns to treating hospice patients, music can be used in medical and psychological treatment with surprising – and real – results.

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