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Analysis and Comment (102)

Purple breast cancer cells self-destruct. Khuloud T. Al-Jamal & Izzat Suffian

How self-destructing cells may hold key to cancer cure

In the time that it will take you to read this article, millions of your body’s cells will have died via a self-destruct mechanism known as programmed cell death. This process is part of your body’s normal…
When cells are deprived of energy and nutrients from their external environment, they package up and consume their own components to survive. Kevin McShane/Flickr

How cancer eats itself to survive our therapies

Can you imagine being so desperate for food that you would eat yourself to survive? Most people can’t but our cells do exactly this. When cells are deprived of energy and nutrients from their external…
Some recommendations are straightforward: more fruit and veg, less alcohol and meat. But for calcium, it’s more complicated. ransomtech/Flickr

Six foods that increase or decrease your risk of cancer

If you believe cancer is a disease that strikes from nowhere with little in your control to prevent it, you’d be mistaken on both counts. Most cases of cancer are considered preventable by positive nutrition…
Cancer cell to stem cells: the drugs are coming. delgrossodotcom

Cancer uses stem cells as a shield to escape drug attacks

Chemotherapy is one of the most important treatments for all types of cancer. It involves the use of drugs that kill abnormally multiplying cells. The therapy uses one or more drugs in combination and…
Low to moderate consumption of alcohol increases your risk of cancer but reduces your risk of heart disease. giannisl/Flickr

How much alcohol is OK? Balancing risks and benefits

For many of us, alcohol is an enjoyable backdrop to life: wine with dinner, beers with friends, a glass of bubbly to celebrate a special occasion, or nip of something heavier to unwind after a long day…
Eating a little red meat is good for building and maintaining muscle. Mike/Flickr

Red meat’s a tasty treat but too much can give you cancer

There are many good reasons to eat red meat, including as a source of protein and iron, but having too much of the stuff significantly increases your risk of cancer. Recent research from China has found…
People with cancer are concerned about losing their jobs if they take ‘too much’ leave for treatment. Lisa F. Young/Shutterstock

Reducing discrimination and financial burdens for people with cancer

Some Australians with cancer face discrimination when attempting to access financial services, are treated unfairly by their employers, and face significant financial burden when travelling for treatment…
Breast cancer rates are rising, but so are survival rates. bookgrl

Hard Evidence: are we beating cancer?

More and more people are beating cancer – over the past 20 years the proportion of people surviving the disease for more than ten years has increased by a third, from 34% to 45%. But as the population…
Immunotherapy boosts the body’s ability to fight disease. Rob Schultz/Flickr

Explainer: what is cancer immunotherapy?

Immunotherapy is treatment that boosts the body’s immune system by producing more infection-fighting agents, such as white blood cells and antibodies, to help fight disease. While it may seem a modern…
A cancer cluster generally features an unusually high number of the same type of cancer occurring in a group of people with a common exposure. Shutterstock

Explainer: what are cancer clusters?

Most of us are living longer and we are all expected to be working longer. Because the likelihood of cancer increases as we age, we’re more likely to be diagnosed with cancer while still a member of the…
Susceptibility to non-melanoma skin cancer doesn’t just come from too much time in the sun. Monkey.net/Flickr

Skin carcinomas linked to increased risk of other cancers

Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) are the most common cancers in Australia and account for seven out of every eight new cancers diagnosed. If detected early, they are relatively easy to treat and rarely…
We can’t always see no evil. Alicakes

Charity campaigns may cause outrage, but shock sells

A campaign for Pancreatic Cancer Action recently stirred up controversy over advertising “shock tactics”. In the advert, genuine sufferers of the disease stated to camera that “I wish I had testicular…
Cancer targets young and old. National Cancer Institute

EU loophole means children with cancer are denied drugs

In spite of a major drive to develop targeted drugs to “personalise” cancer treatments, children with cancer still have to put up with drugs that have remained largely unchanged for decades. Currently…
Reduce your cancer risk by reducing your alcohol consumption. V31S70/Flickr

Health Check: does alcohol cause cancer?

Alcohol and cancer is a topic that arouses a lot of controversy: many Australians like the odd drink but don’t want to make the connection to cancer, the world’s biggest killer. The World Health Organisation’s…
Being obese increases your risk of a number of common cancers. CGP Grey/Flickr

Cancer: the world’s biggest killer

The World Cancer Report 2014, the first global snapshot of cancer since 2008, shows the disease is now the world’s biggest killer. In 2012, there were 8.2 million cancer deaths and 14.1 million new cancer…
There are effective non-drug options for treating insomnia. Alyssa L. Miller

Some reasons why you should avoid sleeping pills

We’ve known for a long time that hypnotic drugs are not good to take for more than one to three weeks because they are habit-forming and increase the risk of accidents. And there’s now a growing body of…
Statistics on tobacco deaths have become banal for many. Image from shutterstock.com

Beyond statistics: the hidden face of smoking-related cancer

The Russian dictator Joseph Stalin infamously said that a single death is a tragedy, a million deaths a statistic. And in tobacco control, there are statistics to die for. Tobacco caused about 100 million…
Before a new drug can be tested in humans it must undergo comprehensive preclinical screening and testing. Flickr / SandiaLabs

Where’s my cure for cancer?

It seems that every week a major breakthrough in the understanding of cancer is announced in the media. So where are all the drugs that should flow from these discoveries? Unfortunately, the road from…
The Beatles' George Harrison died of lung cancer in 2001. Voteprime

One in four could be saved with lung cancer screening

Lung cancer kills more people each year than any other cancer because it’s common and because the majority of patients only start to show symptoms after the disease is already advanced. Despite this there…
Over the centuries, the name cancer has become synonymous with dreaded disease. Jason Lee

What’s in a name? Why we need to reconsider the word cancer

Earlier this year, leading American cancer scientists called for a set of changes to deal with the problem of over-diagnosis and over-treatment caused by cancer screening. Efforts to raise awareness and…
Hot v cold. ssoosay

Chilly temperatures help cancers grow

At low temperatures the human body has a hard time. As the cold sets in, blood vessels constrict to maintain heat and some body parts – like fingers and toes – begin to suffer. Metabolism ramps up to fight…
Consumers ought to know the cancer risk associated with regularly consuming some foods and drinks. Image from shutterstock.com

Informed consent: why some foods should carry a cancer risk warning

The evidence that smoking causes lung cancer is definitive. It took a few decades, but cigarette packs now carry prominent health warnings to alert us to this risk. When it comes to dietary patterns, convincing…
There’s no doubt that some of the chemicals in tattoo ink have been associated with cancer – but it’s a bit more complicated. Image from shutterstock.com

To dye for? Jury still out on tattoo ink causing cancer

Scientists have recently raised alarm over the possibility that some inks used for tattoos contain cancer-causing chemicals. To make matters worse, some pigments come as small particles called nanoparticles…
The International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified outdoor air pollution as carcinogenic to humans. Andrew Tseng

Air pollution causes cancer, so let’s do something about it

Late last week, the world’s leading experts on cancer, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified outdoor air pollution as carcinogenic to humans. The agency’s report, Air Pollution…
The theory likens cancer to organisms such as these green and yellow sea sponges. Steve Rupp, National Science Foundation/Wikimedia Commons

Evolutionary theory of cancer overlooks genetic research

The history of biology is peppered with invaluable contributions by physics and physicists. Even if we leave aside the argument that it’s all just physics anyway, theoretical and practical biology leans…
Fashion tastes probably change too. Simon Whittaker

How your grandparents' life could have changed your genes

If your great-grandparents lived through a famine, their experience could well have altered their genetic code. And three generations later you could well be showing signs of that change. The idea that…
Way before the birds and the bees. Jpogi

New fertility treatment brings hope, but not for all

It’s Nobel season and who could forget IVF pioneer Sir Robert Edwards who won the accolade for medicine in 2010? More than ever before, reproductive medicine is throwing up new treatments and answers to…
One day, if you’re lucky. Niall Kennedy

Despite risk, kids can be space flight pioneers

Humanity is standing on the cusp of a huge technological leap. Commercial space flight could place something that has been the preserve of a chosen few (around 500 people) who’ve completed years of gruelling…
Focal therapy targets and kills only the index cancer calls using heat, cold, or electric currents. Image from shutterstock.com

New pain-free treatment for prostate cancer? Not quite

If you or someone close to you has lived with prostate cancer, you’ve probably come across dozens of emerging treatments in your hours of Googling. One such treatment, focal therapy, has been dubbed the…
Processed meats and large quantities of cooked red meats (more than 500g a week) increase your risk of bowel cancer. Flickr/Pabo76

Health Check: does processed meat cause bowel cancer?

Each year around 14,400 Australians are diagnosed with bowel (colon and rectal) cancer. It’s the second most common newly diagnosed cancer after lung cancer and claims around 3,980 lives a year. The good…
Recent studies show psychedelics can have a positive effect on a range of mental health issues. Shutterstock

Shroom to grow: Australia’s missing psychedelic science

A recent Norwegian study on psychedelic drugs and psychological well-being not only highlighted fewer mental health issues among users of these drugs but also underscored the reinvigoration of scientific…
These data will greatly advance our ability to identify cancers with the same or similar origins. Image from shutterstock.com

Cancer ‘signatures’ offer hope for treatment and prevention

Research published in the journal Nature overnight describes the mutations that make cancer cells grow faster than ordinary cells. These “mutational signatures” don’t just open up avenues for better cancer…
A good yarn: chromosomes are shared out to dividing cells by mitotic spindles. Triesquid

‘Mitotic spindles’ could help develop better chemo drugs

Cells use a tiny machine called the mitotic spindle to share genetic material equally between cells when they divide. But when this process goes wrong it can lead to cancer. For many years we’ve been interested…
The predictive tool might help women make decisions about changing their lifestyle. Image from shutterstock.com

Tool to predict women’s cancer risk could prompt lifestyle changes

Researchers in the United States have developed a new model to predict women’s risk of developing breast, uterine and ovarian cancer, based on individual lifestyle factors. These three cancers make up…
How to best employ combinatorial optimisation for health and wellbeing … ay, there’s the rub! Central Sussex College

Shakespeare and cancer diagnoses: how bard can it be?

Shakespeare’s plays and cancer: two seemingly unrelated topics with an underlying common thread. The techniques that computational linguistics and computer scientists use to analyse the Bard’s works are…
A bit too big for your average hospital. Ars Electronica

Explainer: what is proton therapy?

When you stand in the 27km-long Large Hadron Collider tunnel deep under Switzerland and France it looks as if the chain of blue magnets simply stretches off to infinity. So when people talk about putting…
Angelina Jolie has a double mastectomy after discovering she carried a mutation of the BRAC1 gene. Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire

Supreme Court BRCA patenting decision: experts respond

Millions of women in the US will have access to affordable genetic screening for cancer after the US Supreme Court ruled that a commercial company cannot patent human genes. The screening tests for mutations…
An estimated 5.2% of cancers worldwide are caused by the human papilloma virus. Image from shutterstock.com

Michael Douglas, oral sex and cancer – the facts about HPV

Oral sex is often the first of many forays into sexual intimacy we experience as fumbling teenagers. And for many couples, it remains an important – and enjoyable – part of their sexual repertoire. But…
The Hadron Collider was built to find the Higgs Boson but it might also help us discover better ways to treat cancer. PA/CERN

Cutting-edge particle physics could bring cancer therapy home

The recent case of Neon Roberts and the legal dispute over his treatment for a brain tumour threw the spotlight on the potential risks of using radiotherapy to treat complex cancers in children. Radiotherapy…
Around 70% of cancer survivors report difficulties with memory and concentration after chemotherapy. Image from shutterstock.com

‘Chemo brain’ and cognitive decline after cancer

Cancer and its treatments cause a variety of side effects, some of which people recover from quickly, while others last long after treatment is over. After chemotherapy, around 70% of cancer survivors…
Prescriptions for pain relief are easy to get in the UK but not if you live in certain countries. PA/Julien Behal

Pain-relief access crisis leaves millions suffering around globe

Ten percent of the world consumes 90% of the morphine. At first glance that’s just another statistic about haves and have nots. But it’s more stark than that - particularly if you have cancer in a country…
Being blindly and unrelentingly positive can be a burden to disease sufferers. Image from shutterstock.com

Monday’s medical myth: you can think yourself better

Of all the cultural beliefs about health and illness that saturate the developed world, there is none so pervasive and deeply held as the idea that you can “battle” an illness by sheer force of will. We…
Exercise isn’t a substitute for traditional therapies but should be part of a comprehensive treatment plan. Image from shutterstock.com

Why exercise should be added to cancer treatment plans

One in two men and one in three women will be diagnosed with cancer during their lifetime. The good news is that with earlier detection and improved treatments, the survival rate for many common cancers…
Cancer is a disease in which abnormal cells divide without control and are able to invade other tissues. Tips Times

Explainer: what is cancer?

Few things strike fear into people more than the word cancer, and with good reason. While improvements in cancer therapy and advances in palliative care mean that the illness does not always lead to inevitable…
Based on the evidence, it’s safe to dismiss this one as a myth. Flickr/lism

Monday’s medical myth: deodorants cause breast cancer

The concern that using deodorants and antiperspirants might increase the risk of breast cancer has been around for around for at least 15 years, probably longer. The theory suggests that either parabens…
Epigenetic factors can change due to environmental factors, such as diet, toxins and stress. leeroy09481/Flickr

Explainer: how epigenetics is providing insight into cancer

DNA provides the instructions to make us how we look and contributes to our life expectancy. Identical twins have exactly the same DNA, so why are slightly different in many ways? The answer is epigenetics…
There’s no evidence that diet supplements are a panacea for people who have cancer. Steven Depolo

Vitamin pills' role in recovering from cancer

Dietary supplements are big business, and often people are easily drawn in by marketing claims and anecdotes that vitamin pills may be the answer to all their health concerns. People with cancer tend to…
There are sound business reasons for supporting staff with cancer. Michael Lokner

Creating a friendly workplace for people with cancer

Cancer is now the leading cause of death and disability in Australia. One in two males and one in three females living to the age of 85 in Australia receives a cancer diagnosis at some stage in his or…
Sponges and hydra, which are made of colonies of cells with a small number of cell types, have some similarities with cancer. Biodiversity Heritage Library

An astrobiological view of cancer’s evolutionary origin

Life originated on Earth about four billion years ago. Death, sex and multicellularity came along about a billion years later. According to our new atavistic model, cancer came with multicellularity. About…
Ian Gawler recovered from secondary cancer after conventional and unconventional treatments, including meditation. Sebastien Wiertz

TB or not TB? A second opinion on Ian Gawler’s cancer

Late last year, two oncologists went public with a theory that cancer survivor Ian Gawler’s secondary cancer may not have been cancer at all but tuberculosis instead. At the time, the story made front…
Even without routine mammographs, women with a family history of the disease should be screened. Zanthia

Is routine breast cancer screening doing more harm than good?

Public discussion about the risks of over-diagnosis of breast cancer have left some women wondering whether they should take part in the government’s breast screening program. Let’s take a look at what…
Natural does not necessarily equate to harmless. Nor does conventional equate to unnatural. Flickr/wine me up

Monday’s medical myth: natural cancer therapies can’t harm you

One of the most misleading myths of modern medicine is that conventional cancer doctors reject “natural” therapies in favour of artificial or “unnatural” cancer treatments. This myth has contributed to…
The consortium’s work means cancer’s reign as one of our most devastating diseases may be over sooner rather than later. shutterstock.com

Beginning of the end for cancer?

The first results of the most comprehensive genetic survey of cancer ever to be undertaken by an international consortium of researchers have just started to come in. The consortium is mapping mutations…
Brain cancer and schizophrenia are the two most recent human conditions linked to Toxoplasma gondii. shioshvili

Your cat has toxoplasmosis and you’re worried? Join the club

I should admit straight up that I’m no fan of cats. Like any zoologist I treasure the rare glimpses I have had of lions, leopards, serval and even ocelot. But I have never understood the devotion of so…
Non-communicable diseases are the silent assassins in global health. Risk exposure begins in early childhood, and accumulates across the lifespan. michaelwhays

One year on, what has the UN meeting on non-communicable diseases achieved?

What causes two out of every three deaths in the world, has been described by the Director-General of the World Health Organisation as “a slow motion disaster” and by the Secretary-General of the UN a…
The French paper linking GM corn and cancer in rats should have been rejected on a number of grounds. Vermario

Genetically modified corn and cancer – what does the evidence really say?

French scientist Gilles-Eric Seralini caused quite a stir last week when he claimed he’d shown cancer in rats increased when they were fed genetically modified corn and/or water spiked with the herbicide…
Ovarian cancer is a significant cause of illness and death in Australia. Flickr Lindsey G (modchik)

It’s time to adjust our cancer research priorities

Cancer has been a National Health Priority Area since 1996 because of the burden it places on the Australian community. Of course, cancer isn’t just a health and economic burden – it takes an enormous…
Vaccines are the public health measure that, after safe food and water, have saved most lives. Flickr/VCU CNS

Catch cancer? No thanks, I’d rather have a shot!

A couple of years ago, I contributed to a documentary with the intriguing title Catching Cancer. We don’t normally regard cancer as an infection, so it often comes as a surprise to learn that more than…
Kate Willetts, Aug 28 2008, the first woman to receive the world’s first cervical cancer vaccine, Gardasil. AAP

Australia can beat virus-related cancers if we only show the will

Australia has had a pioneering role in the discoveries that underpin our understanding that some cancers can be caused by infectious agents. But we still face many problems that could be solved if we only…
Arsenic in contaminated soil can be absorbed and have long-term health consequences. hoyasmeg

Soil arsenic from mining waste poses long-term health threats

Exposure to arsenic in soil and gold mining waste may have contributed to a slight increase in past cancer risk in socioeconomically disadvantaged areas in the Goldfields region of Victoria, according…
Bowel cancer screening shouldn’t just be limited to Australians turning 50, 55 and 60. duvelNZ

Bowel cancer screening delays all about dollars but make no sense

In more than 30 years of treating cancer patients, I have seen some health policy decisions that defy common sense. But the most senseless of all is Treasury’s continued refusal to expand the National…
The risk of cancer from air pollution is a fraction of the hazard posed by smoking. EPA/Alex Hofford

Unproven cancer risks diverting focus from real cause: lifestyle

The fixation on potentially cancer-causing chemicals in the air, food and consumer products is diverting attention from the real risks, according to a review of global evidence by an Australian cancer…
xgqsg.

Monday’s medical myth: stress causes cancer

Cancer is a disease of the body’s cells that affects around half of all Australians by the age of 85. Normally cells grow and multiply in a controlled way. But if something causes a mistake to occur in…
Gawler claims to have cured himself of advanced cancer by a series of unorthodox treatments including herbal remedies, meditation, coffee enemas and diets. Nick Olejniczak

Coffee enemas don’t cure cancer: reviewing the remarkable claims of Ian Gawler

It’s not often that a scientific article in a learned medical journal becomes front page news but that was the case recently when a paper I co-authored with Dr Ian Haines of Melbourne’s Cabrini Hospital…
The value of medical research extends beyond pure economics. Flickr/left hand

How does medical research deliver value for money?

The Federal Government’s main medical research funding body, the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), last week announced its 2011 program and development grants, and postgraduate scholarship…
A controversial article in Lancet suggests nuns should be prescribed the contraceptive pill to help reduce their high rates of cancer. AAP

Catholic church urged to give nuns the pill to protect against cancer

The Catholic church should freely distribute the contraceptive pill to its almost 95,000 nuns in order to reduce their “greatly increased risk” of developing female-specific cancers, a paper published…
More than seven thousand Australians die each year of lung cancer but not all are smokers. Flickr/Social is better

Lung cancer patients deserve greater support, whether they smoke or not

Each year 40,000 Australians die from cancer-related illness – the number one cause being lung cancer. Surprised? You’re not alone. According to a recent Galaxy poll which asked asked Australians which…
Many DIYers are not aware of the strict regulations about how asbestos should be removed. OregonDOT/Flickr

DIY renovators now most at risk of asbestos cancers

A study published in the Medical Journal of Australia todays says the increase in the number of malignant mesothelioma cases in Western Australia over the past decade is the result of home renovation and…
Cancer patients need to think twice before adding vitamins to their treatment. shannonkringen/flickr

A helping hand? Vitamins may be dangerous for cancer patients

Previously unthinkable questions about vitamin use by cancer patients are being asked following a series of recent clinical studies. Is it time for cancer patients’ love affair with vitamins to end? Might…
Many men experience reproductive issues yet find it difficult to talk about them. Jane Rawson

Talk about your tackle? There’s no point beating around the bush

Getting men to talk about their “tackle” – those bits below the belt – is no easy feat. And the fact men aren’t talking about their reproductive health means they are putting their health and quality of…
The Cancer Council’s alcohol abstinence message isn’t helpful. flickr/MrTinDC

Ignore the scaremongers – a drink (or two) is alright

The marketing of public health messages can bear some disturbing similarities to the way the tobacco, alcohol and food industries go about promoting their products. Recent suggestions by the Cancer Council…
The breast cancer research agenda is more balanced due to its public profile. AAP

Funding cancer research should not be a popularity contest

Some of the most serious forms of cancer are less likely to be the subject of a clinical trial than cancers with a less significant health impact. Research shows that even being a disease is a popularity…
Prostate cancer survival rates for rural and urban men have widened. AAP

The prostate gap: why you’re worse off in the country

Australia has seen many major advances in disease screening, treatment and surgery over the past few decades. But this progress hasn’t been shared equally around the country. People living outside major…
Health statistics, such as those for breast cancer, are better understood as natural frequencies. AAP

The road to misunderstanding your health is paved with numbers

We rely on professional advice when making decisions about prenatal testing or cancer screening or judgments about test results, such as an HIV test. But there is a need to be wary about what your doctor…
People who live on busy roads are at greater risk of pre-term births.

Counting the ways vehicle emissions (still) make us sick

The body of evidence on the unhealthy effects of traffic pollution is now longer than a stretch limo. Our recent Queensland study found pregnant women exposed to greater levels of traffic pollution had…
The $125m already spent on bowel cancer screening will be wasted if the program isn’t funded in the May Budget. AAP

Saving lives and money: why Australia needs bowel cancer screening

This year 17,000 Australians will be diagnosed with bowel cancer and every week 80 people will die from this disease. Meanwhile Australia’s National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) has run out of…
Hand held radiation monitors don’t detect inhaled plutonium particles which can lodge in the lung and cause long term damage. AAP

Just in case you missed it, here’s why radiation is a health hazard

The March 11 earthquake and tsunami in Japan and complicating nuclear crisis throw into sharp focus concerns about exposure to ionising radiation. What is it, how is it harmful, how much is too much? Inside…

Research and News (32)

Boys to receive Gardasil HPV vaccine

Boys are likely be offered subsidised vaccinations against the sexually transmitted, wart and cancer-causing human papillomavirus…

Research Briefs (108)

New molecule blocks cancer cells in mice

A small molecule, which works by “tricking” proteins into binding with it, has been effective in stopping the growth of cancer…

Genetic link to infant leukaemia

Babies who develop leukaemia in their first few years of life seem to inherit a rare combination of genes from their parents…

Mobile technology does not cause cancer

New research has found there are no links between mobile phone technology and health problems such as cancer. The 11-year…

Positive news for prostate cancer survival

Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in Australia with 25,000 new cases expected in 2020. But mortality…

Cracking the collagen code

Scientists have made a major step toward synthesizing collagen, which could help researchers decipher the protein’s role…

Gene may trigger prostate cancer

A mutated gene could be responsible for triggering prostate cancer, new research has found. The relevant gene, p53, encodes…

New insight into brain cancer

The role of a tumour suppressor in brain cancer known as parkin has been uncovered and promises to shed light on why certain…

Immune system could help treat cancer

Patients may be able to fight cancer in the future using their body’s own immune system. Scientists have engineered a protein…

Infections cause one in six cancers

One in six cancers are caused by largely treatable or preventable infections, according to new research. The research looked…

Melanoma treatment may double lifespan

A new treatment may prolong the lifespan of melanoma patients. Vemurafenib, the first acute melanoma drug in more than a…

Videogame tech enables cancer insights

Scientists at Wake Forest University are using the same graphics processing units (GPUs) found in video game devices to simulate…

Childhood leukaemia cells identified

Scientists have identified the cells that cause a common type of childhood leukaemia – T cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia…

Human cells know when to zip it

We’ve known for a while that human cells “talk” to one another, but new research has found thy know when to shut up, too…

A tomato a day keeps the doctor away

The red pigment in tomatoes could help prevent prostate cancer, according to researchers at a US university. A daily dose…

New approach to cancer vaccines

An international team of scientists has used DNA from healthy cells have been used to create a cancer vaccine to treat prostate…

Could molluscs cure cancer?

The cancer-fighting drugs of the future may be made from the humble sea mollusc, an Australian researcher has found. Australian…

Fertility hope for male cancer survivors

An intricate procedure that finds and carefully removes individual sperm from testicular tissue has made fathers of men who…

Immune response discovery

Scientists at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute have isolated a sub-set of the regulatory T-cells that actually determine…

Cervical cancer vaccination confusion

The campaign to promote the Gardasil cervical cancer vaccine failed to educate adolescent girls about the causes of the cancer…