Articles on Heart disease

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While flossing may not be fun, it is still good for you. From www.shuttertock.com

The flossing flap: Mind your dentist, and floss every night

Millions smiled last week when it was reported that there's no evidence to support the flossing of teeth. A dentist sees it differently and suggests we continue the practice.
A bucket of chips contains around 275mg of sodium, which accounts for 16% of an adult’s daily limit. Darkkong/Shutterstock

Health Check: how much salt is OK to eat?

Around 60% of Australians over the age of two years exceeded the recommended daily maximum intake of salt.
Diabetes is characterised by higher than normal levels of glucose in the blood. Leon Ephraim/Unsplash

How Australians Die: cause #5 – diabetes

Diabetes is a leading cause of death as well as of heart attacks, strokes, amputations, kidney failure, depression and severe infections – all of which themselves contribute to premature death.
Coronary heart disease is almost always a consequence of atherosclerosis; a build-up of cholesterol and other material in the walls of our arteries. Heart Attack Heaven/Flickr

How Australians Die: cause #1 – heart diseases and stroke

Global deaths from heart disease rose from 12.3 million in 1990 to 17.3 million in 2013. Most of the increase occurred in developing countries and in disadvantaged people in developed countries.
The main thrust of the advisory committee’s report is that diets should be focused on whole foods, not specific nutrients. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr

Expert is as expert does: in defence of US dietary guidelines

National dietary guidelines have become an easy target for those looking for a scapegoat for bad diets in rich countries. And a BMJ article about draft US guidelines adds further fuel for the fire.
Older people are more likely to drop out of the workforce for good when they’re sick than young people. Bacho/Shutterstock

Balancing the health budget: chronic disease investment pays big dividends

Economic modelling shows that policies to reduce chronic diseases can have large economic benefits –A$4.5 billion a year for diabetes alone – by reducing health costs and boosting the workforce.

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