Articles on Cancer

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Smartphones make great citizen research tools. We take them everywhere and they have the functions (GPS, accelerometers, camera, audio, video) to sense, share and mobilize data between consenting citizens. (Shutterstock)

How your smartphone can encourage active living

We blame electronic devices for our increasingly sedentary behaviours. So why not harness them to study our movement patterns and tackle urgent health crises?
An MRI image of the brain. SpeedKingz/Shutterstock.com

An unexpected pathway to treating neurodegenerative diseases

Not all drug development needs to start from scratch. Sometimes researchers discover that a drug developed for one disease can be used for another. Here a cancer drug may show promise for dementia.
It’s often hard to comprehend complicated medical information from your doctor – particularly if you’ve just received bad news. From shutterstock.com

Missed something the doctor said? Recording your appointments gives you a chance to go back

It's not unusual to be fed a whole lot of complex medical information by your doctor. Having an audio recording of the consultation that you can play later can help you take it in.
Palliative radiation therapy is effective regardless of a patient’s original cancer site (for example breast, lung or kidney) and is usually delivered in one to 10 daily doses. (Shutterstock)

Cancer pain can be eased by palliative radiation therapy

Palliative radiation therapy can improve a cancer patient's life, by alleviating pain and other symptoms. Unfortunately, some doctors associate the term with end-of-life care and fail to refer people.
The Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto runs a Cancer Rehabilitation and Survivorship Program, which offers one-on-one consults and an eight-week group rehabilitation program for patients. (Shutterstock)

Cancer survivors urgently need funded rehabilitation care

Multidisciplinary rehabilitation teams could help cancer survivors to recover from the toxic side-effects of their treatments and return to their lives.
A new review of 372 patient group submissions to the Canadian Agency for Drugs or Technology in Health – about whether new medicines should be covered by public plans – reveals a total of 1896 conflicts of interest. (Shutterstock)

How Big Pharma donations may influence public drug coverage

A new study reveals how many patient groups lobby for new drugs to be funded by public plans in Canada -- all while receiving funding from the companies manufacturing the drugs in question.
Having cancer is bad enough, and dealing with the costs and confusion of billing systems makes things harder. KieferPix/Shutterstock.com

Confusing and high bills for cancer patients add to anxiety and suffering

A cancer diagnosis is one of the scariest of all. The pain and fear are worsened by a confusing landscape of bills, opaque billing systems and changing insurance rules, rates and reimbursements.
Cancer survivors are honored at a Relay for Life Event in Twinsburg, Ohio, in June 2009. Researchers found that many survivors do not like that label. Kenneth Sponsler/Shutterstock.com

People diagnosed with cancer often don’t embrace the term ‘survivor’

A recent study found that many people who have survived a cancer diagnosis do not like to be called 'survivor.' As World Cancer Day is observed on Feb. 4, their wishes are something to think about.
This is a model of the adenovirus type 5 which causes respiratory infections. Kateryna Kon/Shutterstock.com

Potential treatment for eye cancer using tumor-killing virus

When you think of viruses, you might think of the horrible illnesses they cause, like flu or Ebola. But now researchers are learning how to use the unique traits of viruses to treat disease.

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