Articles on Breast Cancer

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Dr. Karen Lindfors, a professor of radiology and chief of breast imaging at the University of California, Davis Medical Center, examines the mammogram of a patient. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Routine mammograms do save lives: The science

The majority of research suggests the benefits of mammography screening greatly outweigh the harms for women over age 40.
African-American women are about three times more likely to be diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease. mangostock/Shutterstock.com

A new clue into treatments for triple negative breast cancer, a mean disease

Researchers have long been looking for clues into how to treat triple negative breast cancer. Could fighter blood cells that infiltrate the tumor provide insight?
Physical activity has long been considered a way to lower risk for breast cancer. vectorfusionart/Shutterstock.com

How inherited fitness may affect breast cancer risk

Physical activity is considered an important way to lower risk for breast cancer. But what if your ability to be fit is influenced by genes you inherit? Would that raise your risk? In rats, it did.
A recent Canadian trial reports breast cancer over-diagnosis rates of up to 55 per cent, from routine screening mammograms. (Shutterstock)

Routine mammograms do not save lives: The research is clear

October is breast cancer awareness month. Women should know there is no reliable evidence that routine mammograms reduce death from breast cancer, and there's good evidence that they cause harm.
Canadians are overwhelmingly opposed to insurance companies having access to their genetic test results. A new Canadian law prevents insurers from using genetic information to determine coverage or pricing. (Shutterstock)

Why insurers are wrong about Canada’s genetic non-discrimination law

Canadian insurance companies argue that a new law denying them access to genetic test results will raise the cost of insurance for everyone. That's doubtful.
More mammography, for instance, starting at a younger age or screening more often, isn’t necessarily better. from www.shutterstock.com

Three questions to ask about calls to widen breast cancer screening

Calls to routinely offer breast cancer screening to more women might sound like a good idea, but can harm. Here are three questions to ask when figuring out whether more screening really is better.
Women with breast cancer face many treatment decisions on the path to survivorship. One question has been: Can they have fewer doses of radiation and still keep their risks for recurrence low?

Why treating breast cancer with less may be more

Women with breast cancer often have six weeks of radiation therapy after surgery to remove the cancer. A recent study suggests that shortening that time is not only effective but also cost-saving.
Scientists know that many toxins, such as those found in cigarettes, cause most lung cancers, whose cells are depicted here. But isolating causes for other cancers is an ongoing effort. Raj Creationzs/Shutterstock

Is the developed world we’ve created giving us cancer?

What causes cancer? A scary truth might be that we have created an environment for it. An anthropologist's search for answers to her own diagnosis raises questions for all of us.

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