Articles on Breast Cancer

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Canadians are overwhelmingly opposed to insurance companies having access to their genetic test results. A new Canadian law prevents insurers from using genetic information to determine coverage or pricing. (Shutterstock)

Why insurers are wrong about Canada’s genetic non-discrimination law

Canadian insurance companies argue that a new law denying them access to genetic test results will raise the cost of insurance for everyone. That's doubtful.
More mammography, for instance, starting at a younger age or screening more often, isn’t necessarily better. from www.shutterstock.com

Three questions to ask about calls to widen breast cancer screening

Calls to routinely offer breast cancer screening to more women might sound like a good idea, but can harm. Here are three questions to ask when figuring out whether more screening really is better.
Women with breast cancer face many treatment decisions on the path to survivorship. One question has been: Can they have fewer doses of radiation and still keep their risks for recurrence low?

Why treating breast cancer with less may be more

Women with breast cancer often have six weeks of radiation therapy after surgery to remove the cancer. A recent study suggests that shortening that time is not only effective but also cost-saving.
Scientists know that many toxins, such as those found in cigarettes, cause most lung cancers, whose cells are depicted here. But isolating causes for other cancers is an ongoing effort. Raj Creationzs/Shutterstock

Is the developed world we’ve created giving us cancer?

What causes cancer? A scary truth might be that we have created an environment for it. An anthropologist's search for answers to her own diagnosis raises questions for all of us.
Cancer cells, in red, cannibalize a type of stem cell, shown in green. The red cells with small specks of green are breast cancer cells that have “eaten” the stem cell. Author provided.

How ‘cannibalism’ by breast cancer cells promotes dormancy: A possible clue into cancer recurrence

After treatment for breast cancer, many women receive the news that they are cancer-free. In many cases, the disease will come back. How and why does that happen? New findings offer an explanation.
Doctors and patients should appreciate the many roles estrogens play in the body. Doctor and patient image via www.shutterstock.com.

What women with breast cancer should know about estrogens

Estrogens also have many positive effects on mental health, cognitive function, libido and protection of the brain, possibly even slowing the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

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