Articles on Chernobyl

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An abandoned hotel building in Pripyat, a few miles from Chernobyl. Fotokon/Shutterstock

Why plants don’t die from cancer

Most plant life survived the nuclear disaster at Chernobyl - and they have a lack of legs to thank for it.
Philip David Williams / shutterstock

Climate change: six positive news stories you probably missed in 2018

We asked climate researchers to peer through the smog and highlight some positive stories from 2018.
Inside a power-plant cooling tower. Jakob Madsen/Unsplash

How are nuclear risks managed in France?

Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima demonstrated the difficulty of managing a disaster at a nuclear power plant. What is the situation in France?
Workers at Fukushima in January 2018. Behrouz Mehri/AFP

Fukushima seven years later: case closed?

On March 11, 2011, a nuclear disaster struck Japan. Translated testimony by the power plant's manager reveals how close the world came to a greater catastrophe -- and how much there is to be learned.
Students at Ponar Forest in Lithuania, where Nazis massacred many Jews. Daniel B. Bitran

Why tourists go to sites associated with death and suffering

In recent years, the number of people traveling to sites of death, natural disaster, acts of violence, tragedy and crimes against humanity has dramatically increased. Is it immoral?
A doll lies in the ghost town of Pripyat, abandoned since the nearby Chernobyl power plant suffered a catastrophic meltdown in 1986. Henrik Ismarker/Flickr

Friday essay: Svetlana Alexeviech didn’t make it to the Royal Commission

The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sex Abuse has documented heart-rending testimonies and elicited shattering revelations. But how does a society witness itself failing at its most fundamental duty?
White storks on road near Chernobyl, Ukraine. Many parts of the Chernobyl region have low radioactivity levels and serve as refuges for plants and animals. Tim Mousseau

At Chernobyl and Fukushima, radioactivity has seriously harmed wildlife

How do we measure long-term impacts of nuclear accidents? Studies at Chernobyl and Fukushima show that radiation has harmed animals, birds and insects and reduced biodiversity at both sites.

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