Articles on Drug development

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Venom from box jellyfish causes extreme pain and tissue damage. Massive exposure can cause death. from www.shutterstock.com

How we used CRISPR to narrow in on a possible antidote to box jellyfish venom

Box jellyfish stings are excruciating and occasionally deadly. We have identified a common, cheap drug that is already on the market and which could be a treatment candidate with further development.
Pharmaceutical companies have traditionally been the ones to develop drugs. But for rare diseases university researchers may play a role. LeoWolfert/Shutterstock.com

Drug development is no longer just for Big Pharma. Researchers at Bio-X explain

Developing drugs is typically the domain of large pharmaceutical companies. But here is an example of drug development for a rare pediatric brain cancer that was done in a university setting.
Scientists are now using evolution to create designer proteins for therapies and industrial processes. Johan Jarnestad / The Royal Academy of Sciences

2018 Nobel Prize for chemistry goes to scientists who learned to ‘hack’ evolution in the lab

Nature doesn't always make the things we need so three Nobel Prize winners figured out how to fast-track evolution in the lab to create medicines, biofuels and industrial chemicals for modern life.
A drug needs to pass quite a few hurdles before it gets to the market. The Conversation/Wes Mountain

Explainer: how do drugs get from the point of discovery to the pharmacy shelf?

Only around 10% of new drugs in development make it onto the market. A drug needs to go through animal trials, and then four phases of human trials to be deemed suitable for use in patients.
Randomisation is the only commonly accepted method of ensuring an unbiased estimate of the treatment effect. The Conversation/Wes Mountain

Randomised control trials: what makes them the gold standard in medical research?

A randomised controlled trial is the best way to compare a new treatment with the standard treatment. And randomising trial participants is a core feature of the experiment.
3D bioprinted channel, representing a blood vessel within a hydrogel that mimics human tissue. Forget, Heiny, Derme, Mitterberger, Shastri

The next pharmaceutical revolution could be 3D bioprinted

3D bioprinting of living cells and materials may contribute to faster and cheaper ways to create effective new drugs - and even reduce animal testing.

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