Articles on Mathematics

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Assistant professor of chemistry Sidney Wilkerson-Hill, left, in a chemistry lab at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with Bolatito Babatunde, a student in the Chancellor’s Science Scholars program at UNC. Lars Sahl / UNC Chemistry

Here’s how to increase diversity in STEM at the college level and beyond

Researchers find promising results for two programs patterned after the Meyerhoff Scholars Program, a renowned initiative launched at UMBC in the 1980s and known to increase diversity in STEM.
If you thought multiplication tables at school were hard, imagine multiplying numbers with billions of digits. Shutterstock/Nina Buday

We’ve found a quicker way to multiply really big numbers

To multiply two numbers by hand take a few steps but it's something we're taught in school. When dealing with big numbers, really big numbers, we need to a quicker way to do things.
International forces advancing toward Boxer soldiers outside the Imperial Palace in Beijing, China, during the Boxer Rebellion. Library of Congress

3 times political conflict reshaped American mathematics

When is math not just math? Political conflicts have led to new study-abroad initiatives, the creation of a world-class university, the migration of mathematicians and serious educational reforms.
Activists at the Supreme Court opposed to partisan gerrymandering hold up representations of congressional districts from North Carolina, left, and Maryland, right. AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

Want to fix gerrymandering? Then the Supreme Court needs to listen to mathematicians

Supreme Court justices have previously called statistical methods of measuring partisan gerrymandering 'sociological gobbledygook' and 'a bunch of baloney.'
The game is becoming less exciting for fans. Daniel Padavona/shutterstock.com

Statistics ruined baseball by perfecting it

An obsession with statistics has made teams better than ever -- but the game is now more tedious for fans to watch.
Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, responsible for transmitting Zika. AP Photo/Felipe Dana

Why it’s so difficult for scientists to predict the next outbreak of a dangerous disease

In January, measles returned to the Pacific Northwest, while Ebola resurged in the Congo. It would take a lot more research for scientists to be able to stop threats like these in their tracks.
Parents have a responsibility for their children’s math development too. Shutterstock

For the sake of kids, embrace math

Instead of getting "back to basics" to improve math skills, we should make math literacy a priority by developing, attracting and supporting skilled teachers, and improving math literacy at home.

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