Articles on Plate tectonics

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In the field studying the rock association in the Doolena Gap greenstone belt, 30 km north of Marble bar in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. David Murphy

How the Pilbara was formed more than 3 billion years ago

The remote Pilbara region of Western Australian formed many billions of years ago when the Earth was much hotter and the crust softer than it is today.
Ten-year-old Stanton in the ruins of his home following the earthquake that hit Papua New Guinea in February. EPA/Thomas Nybo/UNICEF

Aftershocks hit Papua New Guinea as it recovers from a remote major earthquake

Fresh earthquakes and aftershocks hit parts of Papua New Guinea following February's deadly quake. It's Australia's slow push north that's part of PNG's seismic activity.
The new map was created using data from rocks found in locations including Madagascar. Alan Collins

A map that fills a 500-million year gap in Earth’s history

You would not recognise Earth if you saw it 500 million years ago - the lands, oceans, climate and life were all very different. Scientists now have a new map of the deep history of Earth.
A satellite image of the 2004 boxing day tsunami striking the southwestern coast of Sri Lanka. Could a similar tsunami hit Australia? AAP

Making waves: the tsunami risk in Australia

Australia is surrounded by ocean, so is not immune to the effects of tsunamis. But how significant is the risk?
The recent earthquakes in Japan and Ecuador were large, but were they connected? EPA/Everett Kennedy Brown

Are the Japanese and Ecuador earthquakes related?

When two major earthquakes occur within days of each other thousands of kilometres apart, it can look like they're connected. But are they? Here's what the science says.
Many marine reptiles like this nothosaur went extinct at the end of the Triassic, one of five major mass extinction events on Earth. Brian Choo

Elementary new theory on mass extinctions that wiped out life

A fall in vital trace elements in our oceans could be one of the driving forces behind a number of mass extinction events during Earth's history.
Piton de la Fournaise or “Peak of the Furnace” on Reunion Island is one of the world’s most active volcanoes, shown erupting in August 2015. AAP/NewZulu/Vincent Dunogué

Explainer: why volcanoes erupt

What happens beneath the surface before a volcano erupts? Can we predict when one will blow? And how can typhoons and melting glaciers contribute to big eruptions?

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