Articles on Water management

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Access to the shoreline is great, but what about places not on the coast? Béju (Happy City, Street Plan, University of Virginia)

‘Blue’ space: Access to water features can boost city dwellers’ mental health

Research into public health benefits of integrating nature into cities has focused on green spaces. New studies suggest water features are just as useful and can piggyback on other infrastructure goals.
After years of delay, the New Zealand government is pushing ahead on a national plan to clean up the nation’s lakes, rivers and wetlands. from www.shutterstock.com

New Zealand launches plan to revive the health of lakes and rivers

A proposed plan to clean up New Zealand's waterways draws clear limits on the expansion of dairy farming and irrigation, as well as on the use of nitrogen fertiliser in some key areas.
The receding waters of Lake Pamamaroo, in western NSW, in February 2019. Reduced water supply, due to lower rainfall and higher temperatures, has been the main cause of increasing water prices. Dean Lewins/AAP

Drought and climate change are driving high water prices in the Murray-Darling Basin

High water prices in the Murray-Darling Basin are blamed on foreign investors and corporate speculators. The simple truth is they are caused mostly by lack of rain.
The white “bathtub ring” around Arizona’s Lake Mead (shown on May 31, 2018), which indicates falling water levels, is about 140 feet high. AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin

Western states buy time with a 7-year Colorado River drought plan, but face a hotter, drier future

Western states adopted a 7-year plan in May 2019 to manage low water levels in the Colorado River. Now they need to look farther ahead and accept that there will be less water far into the future.
Chemicals poured down the sink or pumped into the atmosphere can eventually end up in the groundwater, which means less available fresh water for us to use. Flickr/Kamil Porembiński

Curious Kids: how is water made?

While making small volumes of pure water in a lab is possible, it’s not practical. The reaction is expensive, releases lots of energy, and can cause really massive explosions.
When a stream enters a culvert, the flow can be concentrated so much that water flows incredibly fast. So fast, in fact, that small and juvenile fish are unable to swim against the flow and are prevented from reaching where they need to go to eat, reproduce or find safety. Shutterstock

How did the fish cross the road? Our invention helps them get to the other side of a culvert

Our new invention tackles one of the greatest impediments to fish migration in Australia: culverts, those tunnels or drains often found under roads.
The Iguazu Falls in Brazil are part of the Guarani Aquifer, one of the world’s major underground reserves of fresh water. The 8th World Water Forum, part of 2018 World Water Day, is being held in Brazil, home to the most fresh water on Earth. (Shutterstock)

Why every day should be World Water Day

Water is one of our most precious resources, yet it's in danger. World Water Day reminds us of the need to develop policies and governance to avoid squandering water.

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