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Articles on Aging

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The new findings, although preliminary, are raising concerns about the potential long-term effects of COVID-19. Yuichiro Chino via Getty Images

Preliminary research finds that even mild cases of COVID-19 leave a mark on the brain – but it’s not yet clear how long it lasts

Reduced brain volume in people who have experienced COVID-19 resembles brain changes typically seen in older adults. The implications of these findings are not yet clear.
Biologists and demographers are actively debating whether there is a natural cap on the human life span, and how high that might be. eucyln/iStock via Getty Images Plus

The maximum human life span will likely increase this century, but not by more than a decade

Jeanne Calment of France died in 1997 at the age of 122 years and 164 days. That record will be broken this century, statistical models suggest.
Volunteering to pitch in during Breast Cancer Awareness Week may have also helped these Bethune-Cookman University students. Jeffrey Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

4 ways that volunteering can be good for you

Volunteering can improve your life physically, mentally and emotionally. And it might help you find your next job.
In the absence of guidelines or training regarding sexual expression in long-term care homes, most staff are ‘just winging it’ on potentially sensitive issues. (Shutterstock)

Seniors have a right to express their sexuality in long-term care homes, but staff need guidance

In the absence of guidelines or training regarding sexual expression in long-term care homes, most staff are ‘just winging it’ on potentially sensitive issues.
Isolation and segregation create and reinforce another kind of barrier to those with dementia: stigma. (Shutterstock)

How communities can fight the stigma that isolates people with dementia

‘Dementia friendly’ communities seek to support people with memory loss, recognize them as equals, celebrate their contributions and enable them to live with purpose in welcoming communities.
Improving death-friendliness offers further opportunity to improve social inclusion. A death-friendly approach could lay the groundwork for people to stop fearing getting old or alienating those who have. (Shutterstock)

Death-friendly communities ease fear of aging and dying

Death-friendly communities that welcome mortality might help us live better lives and provide better care for people at the end of their lives.
Hydrogen sulfide is a stinky toxic gas, but it has health benefits when released in small amounts inside the body. That’s why eating more plant proteins is linked to longevity. (Shutterstock)

The surprising reason eating less meat is linked to a longer life: A smelly toxic gas

Hydrogen sulphide is a smelly, poisonous gas, but it plays an important role in aging and longevity. New research shows that eating less meat could be a key to harnessing its healthy effects.
People protest outside the Tendercare Living Centre long-term-care facility in Scarborough, Ont. on Dec. 29, 2020. This LTC home has been hit hard by the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette)

Enabling better aging: The 4 things seniors need, and the 4 things that need to change

Canadians are living longer, but are they living well? The challenges to aging well go beyond the problems in long-term care. Substantial change to Canada’s support service systems is long overdue.
Air pollution exposure during mid to early life may be more important to developing Alzheimer’s disease than doctors realized. Cecilie Arcurs via Getty Images

Air pollution may contribute to Alzheimer’s and dementia risk – here’s what we’re learning from brain scans

The tiny air pollutants known as PM2.5, emitted by vehicles, factories and power plants, aren’t just a hazard for lungs. A study finds more brain shrinkage in older women exposed to pollution.

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