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Articles on Automation

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A nurse (left) operates a robot used to interact remotely with coronavirus patients while a physician looks on. MIGUEL MEDINA/AFP via Getty Images

Robots are playing many roles in the coronavirus crisis – and offering lessons for future disasters

Robots are helping health care workers and public safety officials more safely and quickly treat coronavirus patients and contain the pandemic. They have something in common: They're tried and tested.
People living with disabilities, youth, LGBTQ2 people, Indigenous people, certain racialized minorities, immigrants and those with low socioeconomic status, as well as those in some professions, will face complex barriers to entering the workforce in the future. (Shutterstock)

The future of work will hit vulnerable people the hardest

It's critical to determine how Canadians who have been considered vulnerable members of the workforce are meaningfully included within the future of work.
A photo of the last truck to be assembled on the General Motors production line, shown at a sports bar where GM workers congregated after their work work at the General Motors plant in Oshawa, Ont., on its final day of vehicle production, on Dec. 18, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Aaron Vincent Elkaim

Canada can better prepare to retrain workers displaced by disruptive technologies

The federal government must take a stronger leadership role to ensure the many bodies that co-ordinate employment training programs are sharing information to develop best practices.
A recent study conducted by Brookings Institute researchers found artificial intelligence could “affect work in virtually every occupational group”. However, it’s yet to be seen exactly how jobs will be impacted. SHUTTERSTOCK

Work is a fundamental part of being human. Robots won’t stop us doing it

As machine automation and artificial intelligence surge, there's paranoia our jobs will be overrun by robots. But even if this happens, work won't disappear, because humans need it.
Keeping older workers on the job past 65 could help solve Canada’s skill shortage, but the federal parties are silent on the topic. (Shutterstock)

Canada’s aging workforce should have been a major election issue

The Canadian workforce is aging. At the same time, we're facing a skills shortage. Keeping older workers on the job past 65 is an obvious solution but the federal parties are silent on the topic.

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