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Articles on Stem cells

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A cross section of lab-grown human liver tissue. The green shows the network of blood vessels. Velazquez et al. Cell Systems

Genetic engineering transformed stem cells into working mini-livers that extended the life of mice with liver disease

New strategy helps build synthetic organs from scratch. This enabled the researchers to grow functioning liver tissue in the lab that could be transplanted into mice with liver disease.
Just a few millimeters across, organoids are clumps of cells that resemble the brain. Madeline Andrews, Arnold Kriegstein's lab, UCSF

Brain organoids help neuroscientists understand brain development, but aren’t perfect matches for real brains

Brain organoids are tiny models that neuroscientists use to learn more about how the brain grows and works. But new research finds important differences between the model and the real thing.
Currently, stem cell based treatments are still mostly experimental, and while some results are encouraging, several clinical trials have failed. (Shutterstock)

Stem cell treatments: Miracle cures or dangerous experiments?

Stem cells show much promise, both for testing drugs and for treating disease. But the hype around them has been dangerous, as most treatments are in very experimental stages and can cause harm.
Eucomis autumnalis is more than just a plant - it could play a role in biomedical engineering. Gurcharan Singh/Shutterstock

Lab studies suggest medicinal plants can help repair human bone and tissue

Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is based on three key requirements working together: signals from body tissues and organs, responding stem cells, and scaffolds.
The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), shown here as tiny purple spheres, causes the disease known as AIDS. Mark Ellisman and Tom Deerinck, National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research

A cure for HIV? Feasible but not yet realized

Headlines around the world declared that a second person was cured of their HIV. But while the results are encouraging, we’re a long way from a cure.

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