Articles on Health disparities

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Black youth may be less likely to share their thoughts of loneliness or depression than other youth, which could be a reason for higher rates of death by suicide among black youth. Motortion Films/Shutterstock.com

Black kids and suicide: Why are rates so high, and so ignored?

African American youth are at increased risk for death by suicide. An expert explains why it's important to better understand the effects of racism, bullying and alienation on black youth.
Dr. Kyle Parks, the only surgeon at Evans Memorial Hospital in Claxton, Ga. The hospital struggles to stay in business while serving large numbers of rural poor. Russ Bynum/AP Photo

As rural Americans struggle for health care access, insurers may be making things worse

Americans who live in rural parts of the country have fewer doctors, specialists and hospitals than those who live in cities. It also appears that insurers are working against them.
African Americans have worse health outcomes and die earlier than whites. Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock.com

Study: Racism shortens lives and hurts health of blacks by promoting genes that lead to inflammation and illness

The recent death of Elijah Cummings at age 68 underscores a disturbing statistic: black men die, on average, five years younger than white men. A study shows racism's effects on gene activity.
Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis on April 3, 1968, giving the last speech of his life. He addressed social inequalities, discussing the low pay of garbage workers in that city. Charles Kelly/AP File Photo

How unjust social structures help some but harm others

On April 4, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in Memphis. At the root of the injustice that King preached about is structural inequalities. An expert explains what that means.
Providing tools to help African-American men with prostate cancer make decisions about care can make a big difference. michaeljung/Shutterstock.com

Doctors need to talk through treatment options better for black men with prostate cancer

Prostate cancer outcomes have differed between black men and other ethnic groups for decades. Could improving the way doctors talk and share information with black patients make a difference?
From left to right: Toya Tolson, Shawnte’ Spriggs, Sophia Harrison, Marcella Wright and Deborah Dyson. These women are aging with HIV, sometimes with other diseases and always with other challenges. Aamir Khuller

African-American women with HIV often overlooked, under-supported

More people than ever are living with HIV, but people may overlook the fact that many of these long-term survivors are African-American women. They face unique social and health challenges.
An African American man in a hospital bed. Studies show that pain in African American patients is often not addressed. pixelheadphoto/digitalskillet

Dying while black: Perpetual gaps exist in health care for African-Americans

Gaps in care and outcomes between African-Americans and white patients is a major concern to those who care about fairness in health care. Gaps in care also exist at end of life, too.
Mourners wait to attend the funeral of Heather Heyer in Charlottesville, Virginia, Aug. 16, 2017 after Heyer was killed attending a rally to protest white nationalism. Julia Rendleman/AP Photo

Why bigotry is a public health problem

As death tolls rise from hate crimes, a psychiatrist wonders: Is it time to treat bigotry like a disease?
Discrimination creates gaps in care between white and black men. Rawpixel/Shutterstock.com

How anti-black bias in white men hurts black men’s health

White men hold more racial bias toward blacks than white women do, and this harms blacks' health in significant ways. It not only can lead to some diseases but also impedes treatment.
Students at Hampton University celebrate at graduation on May 9. 2010. Studies suggest, however, that the benefits African American students accrue from education will be fewer than those of whites. J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Why it’s hard for blacks to pull themselves up by bootstraps when it comes to health

Many in the US believe that all people can gain riches and education simply by working hard. Here's why that is not true for those have been denied rights and privileges for generations.
African-American women are about three times more likely to be diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease. mangostock/Shutterstock.com

A new clue into treatments for triple negative breast cancer, a mean disease

Researchers have long been looking for clues into how to treat triple negative breast cancer. Could fighter blood cells that infiltrate the tumor provide insight?

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