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Articles on Coronavirus

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Social media sites like Twitter have been a major source of both true and false information regarding COVID-19 vaccines. MicroStockHub/iStock via Getty Images

Countries with lower-than-expected vaccination rates show unusually negative attitudes to vaccines on Twitter

A team analyzed more than 21 million tweets about COVID-19 vaccines and found that negative sentiments on social media were tied to lower-than-expected vaccination rates in many nations.
Researchers can test blood samples taken for other reasons to see if patients have previously had COVID-19. Don Bartletti/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

COVID-19 official counts can miss mild cases – here’s how serosurveys that analyze blood for signs of past infection can help

Your blood can hold a record of past illnesses. That information can reveal how many people have had a certain infection – like 58% of Americans having had COVID-19 by the end of February 2022.
An inmate can be seen inside a segregation cell at the Collins Bay Institution in Kingston, Ont., in 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lars Hagberg

How prisons are using COVID-19 containment measures as a guise for torture

Solitary confinement is still a common feature of prisons across Canada and in its most populous province, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s a practice that amounts to torture.
People are silhouetted as they sit in a bar having a drink during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto on March 30, 2022, as cases continued to climb in Ontario and around Canada after most provinces lifted various restrictions and mask mandates. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Why COVID-19 gaslighting by politicians is so dangerous for democracy

As COVID-19 continues to evolve, surprise, disappoint and frustrate us, efforts by politicians to pretend it’s behind us is a dangerous form of gaslighting that will deepen societal divisions.
Dozens of coronavirus vaccines are in clinical trials in the U.S. Joao Paulo Burini/Moment via Getty Images

Will new vaccines be better at fighting coronavirus variants? 5 questions answered

Existing coronavirus vaccines are not as effective against newer variants of the virus. Two vaccine experts explain how new vaccines currently in development will likely offer better protection.
Health-care workers protest over stalled contract negotiations with the provincial government in Montréal in October 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Workers, not warriors: 4 lessons from health worker protests during COVID-19 that could help avert a looming workforce crisis

To prevent a shortage of health workers, public expressions of appreciation need to be backed by policies that provide dignity, decent working conditions, accountability and appropriate remuneration.
Final approach on the air charter into the Voisey’s Bay mine, a fly-in/fly-out nickel, copper and cobalt mine located near Nain, Nunatsiavut, in northern Labrador. (Matthew Pike)

As mining activity expands in northern Labrador, COVID-19’s ‘new normal’ difficult to accept for Nunatsiavut Inuit communities

‘Living with COVID-19’ has much higher risks for Nunatsiavut Inuit communities than many other areas. Recognizing those risks is crucial as mining operations resume in Newfoundland and Labrador.
A closed pub in Soho, London, in February 2021, during the third national lockdown in the United Kingdom due to COVID-19. (AP Photo/Alberto Pezzali)

Did governments around the world initially over-react to the COVID-19 pandemic?

Initial responses to threats — whether they’re military, strategic or health-related — are crucial to the peace and prosperity of nations. Did governments go too far with COVID-19 lockdowns?

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