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Articles on COVID-19 vaccines

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More than 70 per cent of the world’s population has received at least one COVID-19 vaccination. (Shutterstock)

The first line of vaccines was highly effective at restricting COVID-19’s damage

New analysis answers questions about the ongoing effectiveness of COVID vaccines: How well they protect against infection, hospitalization and death months after initial doses or after a booster shot.
Gain-of-function experiments in the lab can help researchers get ahead of viruses naturally gaining the ability to infect people in the wild. KTSDesign/Science Photo Library via Getty Images

Gain-of-function research is more than just tweaking risky viruses – it’s a routine and essential tool in all biology research

From cancer immunotherapy and antibiotics to GMO crops and pandemic surveillance, gain of function is a cornerstone of basic research.
COVID-19 is still with us, and is still causing serious illness and death. However, it is disproportionately affecting older people. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Ageism and the pandemic: How Canada continues to let older adults suffer and die from COVID-19

COVID-19 is the third-leading cause of death in Canada, but it’s older people who are dying. That we accept this and carry on as if the pandemic is over reveals our ageism: We don’t value older people.
COVID-19 emergency status prompted coordinated vaccination efforts by health care providers, paramedics, volunteers and others. Wesley Lapointe / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Biden’s plan for ending the emergency declaration for COVID-19 signals a pivotal point in the pandemic – 4 questions answered

President Joe Biden’s intention to end the national COVID-19 emergency will have long-lasting ripple effects on federal programs such as Medicare, Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program.
The FDA advisory committee discussed vaccine safety, effectiveness of the current shots, potential seasonality of COVID-19 and more. wildpixel/iStock via Getty Images Plus

FDA advisory committee votes unanimously in favor of a one-shot COVID-19 vaccine approach – 5 questions answered

Many questions remain about next steps for US vaccine policy. But the FDA advisory panel’s hearty endorsement of a single-composition COVID-19 vaccine represents a pivotal step.
XBB.1.5 is rapidly spreading across the globe and will likely become the next dominant COVID-19 subvariant. (Shutterstock)

FAQ on COVID-19 subvariant XBB.1.5: What is it? Where is it prevalent? How does it differ from Omicron? Does it cause serious illness? How can I protect myself? Why is it nicknamed ‘Kraken’?

The XBB.1.5 subvariant — nicknamed ‘Kraken’ — is arguably the most genetically rich and most transmissible SARS-CoV-2 Omicron subvariant yet.
Throughout the pandemic, much discussion about COVID-19 transmission focused on individual-level decisions, making it easy to blame the unvaccinated. (Pixabay)

Beyond vaccine hesitancy: Understanding systemic barriers to getting vaccinated

Systemic social issues affect vaccine access and acceptability. Yet, the term ‘vaccine hesitancy’ overlooks this, reducing the multiple factors that affect vaccine uptake to individual-level choices.
As of Nov. 30, 2022, 62.5% of children and adolescents are unvaccinated against COVID-19. South_agency/E+ via Getty Images

Nurses’ attitudes toward COVID-19 vaccination for their children are highly influenced by partisanship, a new study finds

Nurses who identify as Democrats have a significantly higher likelihood of having their children vaccinated against COVID-19 than those who identify as Republicans.
Pediatric emergency rooms in some states are at or over capacity due to the surging number of respiratory infections. GOLFX/iStock via Getty Images Plus

COVID-19, RSV and the flu are straining health care systems – two epidemiologists explain what the ‘triple threat’ means for children

Respiratory viruses are hitting young children and infants particularly hard this fall and winter season, and experts don’t yet know exactly why.
Media literacy can help you tell the difference between real and false news. Zbynek Pospisil/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Understanding how news works can short-circuit the connection between social media use and vaccine hesitancy

Researchers identified a connection between low levels of media literacy and COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in people who consume their news via social media.
A 10-year-old Toronto boy receives his COVID-19 vaccine shot from a Toronto Public Health nurse at a children’s vaccine clinic at Scotiabank Arena in December 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Adding COVID-19 to ‘designated diseases’ could boost vaccine uptake among children

Adding COVID-19 to a list of ‘designated diseases’ will not make vaccination mandatory for school entry. But it may help increase COVID-19 vaccine uptake among children.
As of August 2022, COVID-19 vaccination rates in Black and Hispanic people exceeded those of white Americans nationally, but only for the initial shots. FatCamera/E+ via Getty Images

Low vaccine booster rates are now a key factor in COVID-19 deaths – and racial disparities in booster rates persist

Early on, public health messaging focused on the need for vaccines to combat COVID-19. But far less attention has been given to the role of boosters in preventing deaths and reducing inequities.
COVID-19 patients receive oxygen as they lie in their beds in the intensive care unit of a hospital in Machakos, Kenya, in August 2021. (AP Photo/Brian Inganga)

Enduring colonialism has made it harder to end the COVID-19 pandemic

A major lesson from the COVID-19 pandemic is the need to decolonize transnational governance so that the world is better able to handle both future and current global crises.

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