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Articles on Vaccine hesitancy

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An anti-vaccination protester holds an upside down Canadian flag during a demonstration outside the venue of a Liberal Party election campaign event, in Newmarket, Ont. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

The anti-vax movement is being radicalized by far-right political extremism

Vaccine hesitancy has been a subject of intense study in the field of scientific communication. Anti-vaxxers recent radicalization needs to be looked at.
Sometimes facts and statistics aren’t enough to convince someone to get the COVID-19 vaccine. PeopleImages/E+ via Getty Images

A direct recommendation from a doctor may be the final push someone needs to get vaccinated

There are a variety of reasons why people do or don’t want to be vaccinated. Depending on how they frame their messaging around vaccination, doctors can often be the deciding factor.
In the reluctance to vaccinate, there is a lack of trust and understanding of the scientific process. Better communication would help rebuild bridges. The Canadian Press/Paul Chiasson

A researcher’s view on COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy: The scientific process needs to be better explained

Before the pandemic, the public perceived science as infallible and inaccessible. But the opening up of research to the general public has changed that perception.
Protesters gather at Indiana University in June 2021 to demonstrate against mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations for students, staff and faculty. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Forceful vaccine messages backfire with holdouts – how can it be done better?

Subtly shifting the crafting and delivery of public health messaging on COVID-19 vaccines could go a long way toward persuading many of the unvaccinated to get the shot.
Intensive care physicians are yet again facing ICU bed and staff shortages as severe COVID-19 cases rise. gorodenkoff/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Medicine is an imperfect science – but you can still trust its process

A critical care doctor brings a frontlines perspective to the frustration of dealing firsthand with vaccine hesitancy and discusses the limitations of science and medicine.
By better communicating how vaccines boost the immune system’s long term “memory”, manufacturers could address vaccine hesitancy. i_am_zews/Shutterstock

COVID-19 vaccines produce T-cell immunity that lasts and works against virus variants

Cell-mediated immunity is particularly effective at eradicating viruses, and more durable. This is important in the fight against COVID-19.
A Delta Health Center worker at a pop-up COVID-19 vaccination clinic in rural Mississippi in April 2021. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

How public health partnerships are encouraging COVID-19 vaccination in Mississippi, Michigan, Indiana and South Carolina

Achieving widespread immunity to COVID-19 through vaccination requires as many people as possible to get their shots, including those who object or haven’t bothered.
FDA approval of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine may boost vaccination rates among those who have been hesitant to get the shot. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)

Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine now has full FDA approval. Here’s what that means for unvaccinated people, organizations and pharma

The U.S. FDA has approved the first COVID-19 vaccine. How is approval different from emergency use authorization, and what difference will it make to a vaccine that’s already in global use?
Studying trends in public adverse event reporting could help researchers address vaccine hesitancy and misinformation. Pict Rider/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Unverified reports of vaccine side effects in VAERS aren’t the smoking guns portrayed by right-wing media outlets – they can offer insight into vaccine hesitancy

Anti-vaccine activists are using the side effect reporting system to spread fear and misinformation about the COVID-19 vaccines. But the database could also be used as a gauge for public concerns.
The children’s book, Little Louis, tells the story of a young boy preparing for his COVID-19 vaccination. (Morning Star Lodge)

Indigenous children’s book ‘Little Louis’ aims to curb COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy with a culturally relevant story

There is an urgent need to combat historically fuelled vaccine hesitancy within Indigenous communities. The best way to do this is through evidence-based knowledge and community-led work.
Unmanaged needle fear is very distressing for those affected and can influence health-care choices. Science-backed methods can help people manage their phobia and get vaccinated. (Shutterstock)

Needle fears can cause COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy, but these strategies can manage pain and fear

For the one in 10 people with a significant fear of needles, getting a vaccination is distressing. This can disrupt vaccination campaigns, but there are effective ways to manage pain and fear.
A man reacts as he gets a shot of the one-dose Sputnik Light vaccine at a mobile vaccination station in St. Petersburg, Russia. (AP Photo/Elena Ignatyeva)

Making sense of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in Russia: Lessons from the past and present

Coverage of Russian vaccination rollout has focused largely on concerns about ethics of development and inconsistent messaging. But Russian-language research complicates this picture.

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