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Articles on Science communication

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Journalists covering scientific research during the COVID-19 pandemic increased their reliance on preprints. (Shutterstock)

Journalists reporting on the COVID-19 pandemic relied on research that had yet to be peer reviewed

Preprints are often free to use, making them more accessible for journalists to report on. However, as they have yet to undergo peer review, science journalists take a gamble on their accuracy.
Professor Glenda Gray was the most visible female scientist in South African media coverage during the first six months of COVID. South African Medical Research Council

Male voices dominated South African COVID reporting: that has to change

Journalists may unwittingly perpetuate the notion that men are the only experts worth listening to. This limits the visibility of women in science.
Kids figure out who’s trustworthy as they learn about the world. Sandro Di Carlo Darsa/PhotoAlto Agency RF Collections via Getty Images

Trust comes when you admit what you don’t know – lessons from child development research

People often try to seem confident and certain in their message so it will be trusted and acted upon. But when information is in flux, research suggests you should be open about what you don’t know.
One of the most popular default colour palettes, rainbow, can actually produce misleading information. (Shutterstock)

How rainbow colour maps can distort data and be misleading

It’s important for scientists to present their data in a accessible and comprehensible manner. However, the colour palettes commonly used to communicate information can also distort and misrepresent it.
In the reluctance to vaccinate, there is a lack of trust and understanding of the scientific process. Better communication would help rebuild bridges. The Canadian Press/Paul Chiasson

A researcher’s view on COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy: The scientific process needs to be better explained

Before the pandemic, the public perceived science as infallible and inaccessible. But the opening up of research to the general public has changed that perception.
September 11, 2021 marks the 18 month anniversary of the WHO declaring the COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic. summerphotos/Stock via Getty Images Plus

18 months of the COVID-19 pandemic – a retrospective in 7 charts

A lot has happened since the WHO declared the coronavirus outbreak a pandemic. A portrait in data highlights trends in everything from case counts, to research publications, to variant spread.
Studying trends in public adverse event reporting could help researchers address vaccine hesitancy and misinformation. Pict Rider/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Unverified reports of vaccine side effects in VAERS aren’t the smoking guns portrayed by right-wing media outlets – they can offer insight into vaccine hesitancy

Anti-vaccine activists are using the side effect reporting system to spread fear and misinformation about the COVID-19 vaccines. But the database could also be used as a gauge for public concerns.

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