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Articles sur Colonisation

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A scene from the author’s film The Message, commissioned by the National Museum of Australia. At the first encounter in Botany Bay, two Gweagal warriors threw stones and spears at Cook, saying ‘warrawarrawa’, meaning ‘they are all dead’. Nik Lachajczak of Zakpage

‘They are all dead’: for Indigenous people, Cook’s voyage of ‘discovery’ was a ghostly visitation

Incidents from Cook's first voyage highlight themes relevant in Indigenous-settler relations today: environmental care, reconciliation and governance. This collision of beliefs, it seems, wasn't lost on Cook.
When Indigenous elder Binno (played by William McPherson) teaches dances to three young men, a bigger plan emerges. Christopher Woe

Black Drop Effect review: infusing the present moment with layers of the past

The world premiere of Nardi Simpson's Black Drop Effect takes in the complex histories of Aboriginal responses to commemoration, and makes space for protest, cultural reclamation and negotiation.
Though her brave acts were acknowledged after her death, Wauba Debar’s grave was later robbed in the name of “science”. Tirin/Wikimedia

Hidden women of history: Wauba Debar, an Indigenous swimmer from Tasmania who saved her captors

A grave stands in Bicheno, paid for by locals in the 1800s. It stands as a testament to the lifesaving ocean feats and tragic life of Indigenous woman Wauba Debar.
A hollow-log coffin painted with Dhal̲waŋu clan Octopus, Perahu Hull, Anchor and Coral Sunset motifs at Gurrumuru against a coral sunset on the horizon. Photo: Aaron Corn

Friday essay: how Indigenous songs recount deep histories of trade between Australia and Southeast Asia

Yothu Yindi's music introduced the world to the Yolŋu clan traditions of northeast Arnhem Land. But few listeners know these songs echo long histories of engagement with Southeast Asian visitors.
In Australia, the interplay between government and Indigenous peoples frequently feels similar to an abusive and controlling relationship. Mick Tsikas/AAP

For Indigenous women, the #MeToo movement is a deeper fight against racism, power and oppression

If the representations we see of black women in Australia only focus on disadvantage and deficit – not success and excellence – how do we expect power imbalances and stereotypes to change?

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