Articles sur Elections

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Delegates after Donald Trump accepted the GOP presidential nomination at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio on Thursday, July 21, 2016. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/via Getty

Political conventions today are for partying and pageantry, not picking nominees

Political conventions used to pick presidential nominees in private. Now the public picks the nominee and then the party has a big party at the convention, writes a scholar of US elections.
Winston Churchill giving his final address, during the 1945 election campaign, at Walthamstow Stadium, East London. Wikipedia, the collections of the Imperial War Museums

When a winner becomes a loser: Winston Churchill was kicked out of office in the British election of 1945

Even a highly popular and respected leader can lose an election, writes a historian – especially if they don't have a plan for the future. Churchill was one of them.
Georgia voters brought folding chairs, books, laptop computers and plenty of patience to the polls on June. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Georgia’s election disaster shows how bad voting in 2020 can be

Voters across the nation should prepare for similar circumstances in their communities – but there is still time for them to demand better from their officials.
A regional election commission member in Banyuwangi, East Java, is tested for COVID-19. Indonesia plans to hold its biggest regional election in December this year. Budi Candra Setya/wsj/Antara Foto

How to elect the right leader by getting rid of our cognitive biases

Recognising our cognitive biases and avoid them will help us make sounder decisions, and therefore, a better decision for our country!
Protesters rally to have Colorado’s then-incoming governor put an up-to-nine-month moratorium on oil and gas development. Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images

Money talks: Big business, political strategy and corporate involvement in US state politics

Millions of dollars are spent every election by corporations that want to influence state regulations and policies, and that's likely to continue in the upcoming election.
William Barr walks through Lafayette Park before demonstrators were cleared by federal police on June 1, 2020. Joshua Roberts/Getty Images

Should the president pick the attorney general?

Do US attorneys general act in the public's interest, or the interest of the president who appointed them?
Gerald Dent, left, is joined by James Featherstone and Niles Ringgold at a rally for felon voting rights, in Baltimore, Maryland, on March 10, 2020. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Stripping voting rights from felons is about politics, not punishment

Recent efforts to restore voting rights to the formerly incarcerated, a crucial Democratic constituency, could have important implications for the 2020 presidential election.
An Ohio election official on the night of the primary vote rescheduled from March 17 to April 28. AP/Gene J. Puskar

Delaying primaries helps protect incumbents as well as voters

To many, the idea that states might cancel or postpone their primary elections as a response to the COVID-19 epidemic sounds undemocratic. What's the political effect of these postponements?
Milwaukee voters wait in a social-distancing line, some wearing masks, before voting in the state’s spring elections on April 7. AP Photo/Morry Gash

Why the Supreme Court made Wisconsin vote during the coronavirus crisis

The Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Roberts has reversed its decadeslong practice of protecting voters' rights and removing barriers to casting ballots.

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