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Articles sur Gallipoli

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Australian soldiers in the trenches at Anzac Cove on the Gallipoli peninsula in Turkey in 1915. State Library of Victoria/Wikimedia Commons

The Anzac legend has blinded Australia to its war atrocities. It’s time for a reckoning

When the honour of Australia’s revered soldiers is questioned, so, too, is the national self-image. But war is an ugly business, and we pay a price for tethering it so tightly to our identity.
A British Pattern 1907 bayonet with leather scabbard. Wikimedia Commons

Friday essay: a short, sharp history of the bayonet

There is no weapon more visceral than the bayonet. It encourages an intimate form of killing, and during WW1, Australia troops plunged, parried and stabbed with great vigour.
Turkish soldiers in a trench at Gallipoli. The way Turkish youth commemorate the battle tells us much about the country’s politics. Ausstralian Dept of Veterans Affairs

Gallipoli commemorations of Turkish youth tell us much about politics in Turkey

At Gallipoli this Anzac Day, thousands of Turkish youth will re-enact a march that stopped the Anzac advance in 1915. The march has taken on new significance in Turkey since an attempted coup in 2016.
The Qingming Festival, also known as Tomb-Sweeping Day, is marked by Chinese people by going to the cemetery to clean up tombs, bring flowers, and make offerings to their ancestors. Jerome Favre/AAP

Why China will be watching how we commemorate Anzac Day

Like Australia, China traditionally commemorates those who served in war in April each year, and increasingly they do it via social media.
The Cu Chi tunnels may be the most popular of the ‘war tourism’ attractions in Vietnam. www.dreamtime.com

Will tourism transform the way Australians remember the Vietnam War?

Might the rise of heritage tourism and the increasing ease of international travel lead to more of Australia’s military experiences overseas being better understood?

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