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Articles sur Infectious diseases

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The huge number of active coronavirus infections offers plenty of opportunity for mutations to occur and new variants to arise. Eoneren/E+ via Getty Images

Massive numbers of new COVID–19 infections, not vaccines, are the main driver of new coronavirus variants

When the coronavirus copies itself, there is a chance its RNA will mutate. But new variants must jump from one host to another, and the more infections there are, the better chance this will happen.
While prison may isolate people from the larger community, it does not isolate them from COVID-19. Scott Olson/Staff/Getty Images News

Correctional officers are driving the pandemic in prisons

New research shows correctional officers are vectors of infection, driving COVID-19 rates both inside prisons and in their communities.
People suffering from long-term effects of COVID-19 face uncertainty about the nature of their symptoms and how long they might last. Halfpoint Images/Moment via Getty Images

Deciphering the symptoms of long COVID-19 is slow and painstaking – for both sufferers and their physicians

Researchers are piecing together clues to better understand the puzzling array of symptoms in those who never seem to fully recover from COVID-19.
Security precautions, thoughtful facilities design, careful training and safe lab practices help keep pathogens isolated. Boston University Photography

We work with dangerous pathogens in a downtown Boston biocontainment lab – here’s why you can feel safe about our research

The microbiologist who directs the National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories at Boston University explains all the biosafety precautions in place that help him feel safer in the lab than out.
Sequencing the whole genome of patient virus samples lets scientists watch for new variants. Sergei Malgavko/TASS via Getty Images

Where coronavirus variants emerge, surges follow – new research suggests how genomic surveillance can be an early warning system

By merging genomics with classical epidemiology, researchers are able to predict new disease outbreaks based on which viral variants are on the rise.
Sequencing the genetic code of virus samples taken from COVID-19 patients reveals how SARS-CoV-2 is spreading and changing. Nate Langer/UPMC

Genomic surveillance: What it is and why we need more of it to track coronavirus variants and help end the COVID-19 pandemic

The US lags in testing coronavirus samples from COVID-19 patients, which can help track the spread of the virus and the emergence of new variants. But labs are ramping up this crucial surveillance.
A doctor shows an empty vial of the experimental Soberana 02 vaccine for COVID-19 being developed at the Molecular Immunity Center during a media tour of the facility’s vaccine production in Havana on Feb. 25, 2021. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

The scene from Cuba: How it’s getting so much right on COVID-19

Cuba’s access to internationally produced vaccines was nearly impossible due to the U.S. blockade. Its decision to make its own vaccines stands to pay off handsomely.

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